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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – RAISING AWARENESS What Is World #MentalHealth Day 2019, What Is Its Logo And How Can I Get Involved?

Each year the day is held to help raise awareness of #mentalhealthissues and encourage open conversations for sufferers

THURSDAY is #WorldMentalHealthDay and there are lots of ways you can get involved to raise awareness or money.

The day occurs annually on October 10 – but what else do we know? Here’s all the information you need.

 Today is World Mental Health Day - but what does that mean and how can you get involved?
Today is World Mental Health Day – but what does that mean and how can you get involved?

What is #WorldMentalHealthDay?

The event takes place every year on October 10 and it aims to educate and raise awareness of #mentalhealthissues.

The day was set up by the World Federation for #MentalHealth and it was first celebrated in 1992.

Each year the event has a different theme and this year it’s psychological first aid and the support people can provide to others in distress.

#Suicideprevention is the primary focus for the 2019 theme for #WorldMentalHealthDay.

 The day takes place every year on October 10 with the aim to help raise awareness of mental health issues
The day takes place every year on October 10 with the aim to help raise awareness of mental health issues

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Why are #mentalhealthissues important?

According to the World Health Organisation, “if we don’t act urgently, by 2030 #depression will be the leading illness globally.”
And while #suicide isn’t always related to #mentalhealth problems, there are links, and currently suicide is the most common cause for for men aged 20-49 years in England and Wales.

 The day is marked with a green ribbon logo
The day is marked with a green ribbon logo

Having said that, you shouldn’t always assume that someone suffering from #mentalillness is also suicidal – but it makes it clear that more needs to be done.

This can range from improvements in #mentalhealth care provision on the NHS to more open conversations about #mentalhealth.

Other #mentalhealth facts to bear in mind

1. Mixed #anxiety and #depression is the most common mental disorder in Britain.
2. As many as 10 per cent of people in England will experience #depression in their lifetime.
3. The poorer and more disadvantaged are disproportionately affected by common #mentalhealth problems and their adverse consequences.
4. Ten per cent of mothers and six per cent of fathers in the UK have #mentalhealth problems at any given time.
5. One in five teens experience a #mentalhealth problem in any given year.
All statistics from The #MentalHealthFoundation.

How can you get involved?

You can get involved in a number of ways, including hosting a Tea&Talk fundraising event for friends and family.

If you want to hold one, simple gather up some people and talk about #mentalhealthissues over a tea and possibly biscuits.

 If you want to get involved you can host a Tea & Talk day or get an information pack with other ideas
If you want to get involved you can host a Tea & Talk day or get an information pack with other ideas

If you want to make a donation to the #MentalHealthFoundation, text THRIVE to 70300 to give £3 or donate online.

Those interested can take action by educating themselves about #mentalhealth and recognise the signs of #mentalhealthissues.

They can also organise conversations at offices, schools and their local community with friends, neighbours and family members about the importance of #mentalhealth and how to quickly recognise the signs of #mentalhealth problems such as #depression.

Other ways to observe World Mental Health Day include volunteering or donating to #mentalhealth clinics and services that help people suffering from #mentalhealthissues, registering for group therapy sessions and practising proper #mentalhealth self-care for themselves, such as by exercising, eating healthy, volunteering, meditating and seeking counselling if necessary.

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Today Is World Mental Health Day

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Struggling? #MentalHealth Help Available

By Sara Arthurs –

Photo by Kat Jayne on Pexels.com

Photo by Kat Jayne on Pexels.com

By SARA ARTHURS
Staff Writer

This year’s farming season has been very difficult, and organizations at the state level want farmers who are struggling to know that #mentalhealth help is available.

Bobbie Boyer, deputy director of prevention services for the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, said she sometimes meets with people who live in cities who are not aware of the stress that Ohio farmers are under.

She encourages neighbors, friends and family members to check in on farmers.

#JamesDonaldson notes:
 Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.
Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is oe of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.
Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle
 

In general, farmers are people who emphasize being self-sufficient and keeping things to themselves, or to “make things work on their own” rather than seeking help, said Dr. Justin Trevino, medical director for the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

And farming involves isolation, he said, so for those who do want to seek out #mentalhealthcare, the options are fewer.

A 2018 study by the Department of Health and Human Services reported that 53% of rural areas were designated as having a shortage of #mentalhealthprofessionals, Trevino said.

In addition, people who live in the country are more likely to own firearms, which are often used as a means of #suicide, Trevino said. Aging white males are known to be at a higher risk of #suicide in general, and farmers tend to be older and #male, he said.

Trevino said experts know chronic stress can make a person predisposed to developing #depression. Sadness or feeling down for a short period of time can be just a normal part of life, but biological #depression is more sustained, and the person may lose hope, not sleep or eat well, and be very unhappy all the time, he said.

Trevino noted that another issue is “farming as an identity — when farmers are struggling financially, they can see themselves as ‘failures.’”

At the state level, Ohio’s Department of Agriculture and Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services have teamed up to make resources available for farmers. OSU Extension offices and farm bureaus have also been part of this effort.

The Mental Health and Recovery Services Board of Seneca, Sandusky & Wyandot Counties recently provided information and outreach to farmers at the Seneca County Fair. Deputy Director Robin Reaves said people were grateful for the support.

“Being that we are a rural community, we struggle with #stigma,” she said in an email. “There is still a hesitation that exists in our community with people asking for help and with feeling comfortable with talking about one’s #mentalhealth status and needs.”

And, she said, farmers are part of a long history “where it was not OK to talk about #mentalhealth or to seek treatment. We hope that our efforts help people feel more comfortable about having these conversations and using the available resources.”

Reaves said her staff also wants to reach out to professionals who work with farmers, like loan officers or insurance agents.

“They are witnesses to the impact this season is having on farmers and they at times have to be deliverers of unfortunate financial news, and we want to give them the tools and resources that can be helpful during these conversations,” she said.

The Hancock County ADAMHS board plans a similar effort at the upcoming Hancock County Fair. Executive Director Precia Stuby said in addition to the isolation of farming, there is the stress that comes with the volatility of the profession.

“Everything can look great, and then you can have a hailstorm and everything can be gone,” Stuby said.

Also, she said, a farm may be passed down from generation to generation, so there is a feeling that if things don’t go well, you are letting your family down.

Stuby said some #farmers have fared better than others this year, but it’s important not to “blame or shame” others or to say, if only “you had done it THIS way.” Instead, “We just need to reinforce that everybody has done their best.”

Ginny Williams, the Family Resource Center’s chief clinical officer, said people think of “grief” and “loss” as having to do with a death or a divorce. But what farmers face involves a sense of “loss of identity,” or a loss of the farmers’ “hopes, dreams and expectations.”

And, as most farmers are men, some may see it as “a challenge to their masculinity” to reach out and ask for help, though “we certainly know that’s not true.”

While a farmer may “intellectually have that understanding” to realize they cannot control the weather, they may still feel angry, disappointed or scared, Williams said.

Family Resource Center will be offering an eight-week course on the “grief recovery method” from 6-8 p.m. Mondays beginning Sept. 23. It’s free to attend, and participants should commit to all eight weeks. To register, contact Family Resource Center at 419-422-8616.

Boyer said farmers’ spouses and children also must be considered, as “the stress is on the whole family.”

She said resources include “Man Therapy,” an online mental health resource geared toward men, as well as the online series “Cultivating Resiliency for Women in Agriculture.”

Boyer also recommended “Mental Health First Aid” or “Question, Persuade, Refer,” both trainings in which a person can learn how to respond to someone else in a crisis, similar to CPR. (For information on local classes, contact Focus at 419-423-5071 or the ADAMHS board at 419-424-1985.)

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Is #Suicide Preventable? Experts Weigh In

Suicide risk isn’t always tied to mental health conditions

image

BY LIZZ SCHUMER

suicide prevention - Unhappy girl writes help on the ground

When Jennifer Ashton’s ex-husband Rob Ashton died by #suicide in 2017, her family was blindsided. Rob hadn’t talked about wanting to die or displayed other traditional warning signs for suicide like increased use of drugs or alcohol or acting anxious or agitated.

In the wake of Rob’s death, Jen, who is ABC’s chief medical correspondent and health editor, has said she didn’t think his death was preventable. “There are other factors at play that we don’t totally understand,” she says.

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.
Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.
Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Since 1999, #suicide rates have increased by 30%, with nearly 45,000 people dying by #suicide in 2016 alone. Now, the #CentersforDiseaseControlandPrevention lists #suicide as the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S.

Groups like the Suicide Prevention Resource Center and the Suicide Prevention Lifeline provide useful lists of warning signs, but suicide risk often includes a complex mix of #mentalhealth factors like the existence of undiagnosed mood disorders, and social risk factors, like economic stability and incidence of abuse, that can make #suicide difficult to predict or prevent.

In fact, more than half of people who die by #suicide did not have a known #mentalhealthcondition.

“Even very well-trained clinical experts are about as good as a flip of the coin in detecting suicidality,” says April Foreman, Ph.D., an executive committee member for the American Association of Suicidology.

How to Reduce the Number of People Who Die By #Suicide

#Suicide may not be fully preventable, but several steps can help reduce the number of people at risk.

suicide prevention - Men joining hands in group therapy

Where suicide risk is concerned, prevention takes a village

Train doctors

Three out of four #suicide victims had contact with primary care providers within one month of #suicide, compared to one in five who had contact with #mentalhealthproviders. That means primary care providers need to get better at recognizing the signs of #suicide risk.

Invest more money

In 2017, about $100 million was spent on suicide research, according to the National Institutes of Health, compared to $690 million on breast cancer, or $2 billion on Alzheimer’s, despite lower mortality rates. More funding would mean more research and likely more effective intervention, including training more teachers, parents, and everyday citizens. Foreman recommends calling your legislators to ask about #suicideprevention plans in your state. “Find out what infrastructure and what public health agendas are supported by your county or your state,” she says. “And if you do not have one, ask why.”

Make a plan

On an individual level, Jane L. Pearson, Ph.D., chairwoman of the Suicide Research Consortium at the #NationalInstituteofMentalHealth, recommends creating a safety plan with at-risk people in your family and community. That involves writing down the set of skills a person already has to keep themselves alive; distractions they may employ, people they can call, and triggers that make them feel #suicidal. “It takes maybe 20 minutes, half an hour if you do it really well,” she says. “But it’s time well spent.”

Get rid of guns

Removing lethal weapons may not be a popular solution, but a study by the Harvard School of Public Health found that in states where gun ownership was more prevalent, rates of #suicide were higher. The inverse was also true. Given that nine out of ten people who attempt suicide unsuccessfully do not do so again, removing access to more lethal means can be hugely beneficial.

Remember these words

#Stigma surrounding suicide can make people feel uncomfortable seeking help, says John Ackerman, Ph.D., the coordinator at Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Center for Suicide Prevention and Research. Talking about #suicide won’t put the idea in a person’s head. Instead, keeping communication open can make those at risk more likely to reach out.

“We teach people to use the phrase ‘tell me more’ when talking to people who may be at risk for #suicide,” says Maureen Underwood, LCSW, clinical advisor at the Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide. “Those words validate a person’s feelings and gives them permission to elaborate.”LIZZ SCHUMER Staff Writer

Photo by Kat Jayne on Pexels.com
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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Dalai Lama Quote to Share With You

The Dalai Lama was asked what surprised him most, he said “Man. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”

We can race for the cure… but, we can’t run from the cause.

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Blaming #MentalHealth For #MassShootings Shows ‘Complete Lack Of Understanding’ Of Gun Violence In America

By LOUISE A. FLAVAHAN

#GOP pivots towards #mentalhealth, video games and rates of interpersonal gun violence in urban centers like Chicago in the wake of mass carnage are both disingenuous and tiring. It shows a complete lack of understanding about gun violence in America and an even greater lack of conviction in addressing it.


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Violence prevention, as a field of research, policy and programming is broken into broad categories that help frame and guide prevention approaches. These categories include: interpersonal violence, self-directed violence or #suicide, elder abuse, gender-based violence (often called “violence against women” in the U.S.), violence against children, youth violence, and collective violence (or war). These categories can be further subdivided into more specific forms such as gang violence, intimate-partner violence (domestic violence), child sexual abuse, etc. Although there is some overlap across forms, the risk factors — the pathways toward each form of violence — are different. And, as you might surmise, the approaches to prevention for each are likewise different.

“Gun violence” is actually at least four different categories of violence: interpersonal violence (the gun violence we see in urban centers), self-directed violence or #suicide, intimate-partner violence, and mass violence. To be sure, there are general gun violence prevention measures that would yield results across categories, but each form of gun violence will require tailored, multi-pronged policy and programming to address the unique risk factors involved.

Capitulating on one form by practicing “whataboutism” in regard to another (say by talking about interpersonal gun violence in Chicago after a mass shooting in El Paso or Dayton), does little to offer meaningful solutions to either problem and focusing on any one “cause” or solution will not be effective. For instance, when #mentalhealth is discussed by politicians as both the root cause and potential cure-all for gun violence — especially in the context of mass violence — it should signal to every American that these politicians needs better policy advisors.

In terms of policy approaches to gun violence prevention, “#mentalhealth” typically means restricting access to firearms among those with a diagnosed #mentalhealth condition or increasing access to health care — the latter of which is something we should value and advance in the U.S. generally.

This is an effective prevention approach in the context of #suicide; where we know that nine out of 10 individuals who attempt #suicide have an underlying #mentalhealthcondition. We also know that nine out of 10 people who survive a #suicide attempt will go on to die of other causes — indicating some degree of recovery. However, evidence shows that 85 to 90% of people who attempt #suicide with a firearm will succeed in ending their lives. Guns are highly effective killing machines; it is what they have been explicitly designed for. And guns account for more #suicides in America than all other means or methods combined. Reducing access to more lethal means, such as guns, among those who are at risk of #suicide due to #mentalhealth will categorically saves lives.

But this approach will not be nearly as effective in preventing interpersonal gun violence or episodes of mass shootings. There simply isn’t an evidentiary basis for connecting #mentalhealth to the perpetration of interpersonal violence. In fact, individuals with a mental health condition are far more likely to be victims of violence than perpetrators. And while the exact number of perpetrators of mass gun violence who suffered from a #mentalhealthcondition is unknown (they are often killed during the attack itself and are thus never diagnosed), estimates range from 20 to 60% of all perpetrators. The problem is that the majority of these perpetrators are unknown to the #mentalhealth system prior to their attacks, meaning they would not have been prevented from purchasing a firearm even if restrictive legislation based on #mentalhealth status were passed.

And besides, even if we were 100% effective in restricting access to firearms among those with a #mentalhealthcondition, we would only reduce violent crime in this country by 4%. Meaning we would further stigmatize a population that already faces a high degree of marginalization with minimal impact on interpersonal or mass gun violence.

And this is but one example of the complex, multi-faceted nature of gun violence in America. Like all problems that are complex and multi-faceted, it demands complex and multi-faceted solutions. And we need to start demanding our politicians be committed to passing and funding all of them if we are serious about solving gun violence in America.

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Point of View: Reducing #Stigma Of #MentalHealth Is Key To Reducing #Suicide Deaths

The recent #suicide deaths of two students who survived the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and a father who lost his daughter at Sandy Hook Elementary School are heartbreaking reminders of the trauma that school or workplace violence can inflict on survivors. They also underscore the need for treatment and support, long after an incident occurs.

In Florida, death by #suicide is the second leading cause of death in the 15-24 age group. More teenagers and young adults die by #suicide than from motor vehicle accidents or homicides. While more girls attempt #suicide and more boys die by #suicide, the rates of death by #suicide have increased over the last decade for the young, the old, and our #veterans.

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

But there are actions we can take to reduce #suicide deaths. Prevention, post-event intervention and providing community #mentalhealthtreatment resources are key to reduce the number of #suicide deaths.

Florida needs a multi-track strategy for addressing its #mentalhealth challenges, and these are positive steps forward.

As a state, what can we do? Let’s start with prevention. This includes training and education aimed at reducing the #stigma of #mentalhealth treatment, particularly for people having #suicidalthoughts. Studies show that the Gen X and Boomer generations are less likely to make a negative association about seeking #mentalhealthtreatment. However, those in the Generation Z and Millennial generations are more likely to feel ashamed when actively seeking help.

Programs like #MentalHealthFirstAid teach people how to recognize the signs of a #mentalhealth or addiction crisis, initiate a conversation, and ultimately connect people to professional help and community resources. Everyone can #BeTheDifference for someone who is struggling with a #mentalhealth or substance use problem if they know what to say and what to do.

Somehow in our society, we talk openly about cancer, diabetes and heart disease yet we whisper about diseases of the brain like #mentalillness, #depression and bi-polar disorder. Together each one of us can raise the public awareness of #suicide deaths and the role we can play in saving lives, simply by talking about it and messaging that is safe to seek treatment.

Post-event intervention activities are those which reduce risk and promote healing after a #suicide death. We know that a key indicator for a future #suicide death is a past attempt. When someone experiences a loss by a #suicide death, they need their own intervention to prevent another #suicide death. These interventions include offering #mentalhealth treatment using trauma-informed care, peer-to-peer support, and spiritual support.

There is also a need to improve #mentalhealthprevention programming in our schools; We should make #mentalhealthprevention programming available in every grade, in every school, for every student, every year. Better yet, make it part of the curriculum.

Additional #mentalhealth expansion should include services for students year-round, not just during the school year. Plus, the #MentalHealthFirstAidTraining should be offered to both parents and #students along with school personnel. The training can help students feel safe in reporting #suicidethoughts and other #mentalhealth concerns.

These are the types of programs and activities that the Institute for a Safer Florida endorses.

Just as there is no single cause that leads to death by #suicide, there is no single prevention effort that will reduce #suicide death rates. But a combined effort, over time, may begin to make a difference. The #mentalhealth of our young people, our veterans, our neighbors, our families, and our children is too precious to waste. Start a conversation today.

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