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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Former #NBA player drops in at #CascadeHighSchool

(Photo by Kalie Drago) James Donaldson, former NBA player, faced the eager crowd of students to address a somber topic.

    #JamesDonaldson, a name that resonates with #basketball fanatics, spoke to #CascadeSchoolDistrict #students Tuesday, March 25. Donaldson played 14 seasons in the #NBA along with playing for #WashingtonStateUniversity.

He didn’t come to give tips on how to master lay-ups or discuss the adrenaline rush from dunking – he came armed with advice and tips on a darker topic, that is as deeply ingrained in his personal life as basketball in his professional life. Donaldson spent an hour and some minutes talking to students about #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention.

Click Here to Read Article About James Donaldson Battling Mental Health Issues

    “Life is a journey, it’s filled with ups and downs and twists and turns. And you really never know how it’s going to turn out,” said Donaldson. “The reason I’m here today is to talk about some of the tough, challenging times in life that all of us are going to go through at some point in life.”

Donaldson opened the presentation personably as if he was chatting with friends over coffee. Despite recalling the saddening elements that led up to his grapple with #suicidalthoughts, he managed to keep the conversation moving fluidly and didn’t hesitate to share.

“Last year, 2018, I went through a very difficult point in my life, where everything that could go wrong, went wrong,” said Donaldson. “(Eventually he said to himself) James, you’ve got to get out of this. I don’t want people running around telling my story, I want to stick around and tell my story. And that was the beginning of me trying to work my way out of that darkness.”

The tall man that was well known for executing basketball plays on the court was vulnerable as he branched into the parts of his life that led to the collapse of his #mentalhealth. He touched on his #physicaltherapy business failing, his #marriage failing and dealing with the loss of his #mother.

“I could just feel the walls of the house closing in on me, I could feel this darkness coming over me, this loneliness, this pain,” said Donaldson. “I started having these #mentalissues, where I asked myself ‘is it even worth continuing to live?’ I wanted to take my life. I didn’t think my life was worth living.”

He openly translated the harsh reality of contemplating #suicide and the ways he had mapped out he could commit #suicide – the rawness of a man that doubled as many people’s basketball idol in his former years seemed to keep the students engrossed.

“And this is why I’m here today, to talk to you all about your lives. You’re all going to go through tough times from time to time. Some of you may be going through tough times right now,” said Donaldson.

Donaldson also shared a video of a girl in her junior year of high school that committed #suicide. Since Donaldson isn’t in the same age demographic with the same problems, this served as a link for the high schoolers to someone in more similar shoes. The video also illustrated the aftermath of taking one’s life and the ripple effect it has on those intertwined in that person’s life.

“She looked perfectly fine on the inside, but her diary entries showed she was struggling with a lot of things,” said Donaldson. “This young girl when she took her life, you see her parents, how hurt they are. How much they’re grasping for answers that she’s not here to explain. So I want you all to think before you get in a deep, dark, depressing place what it’s going to do to your family and friends. The people who are left behind are the ones who are really traumatized.”

Since his own struggle with #suicidalthoughts, Donaldson has found that in order to cope and combat the problem, he needed to find a purpose in life. He revealed that his purpose in life is his foundation, #YourGiftofLife – a program focused on #suicidepreventionandmentalhealthawareness.

“What helped me more than anything, more my doctor or my friends, was to go out and find a purpose for me to keep on staying here. That purpose turned out to be a #nonprofitfoundation called #YourGiftofLife,” said Donaldson. “I want people to realize truly how much of a gift your life is. Don’t throw it away, don’t abuse it, don’t take it for granted.”

After the assembly, his presence at the high school wasn’t over. Donaldson passed out his business cards with a reminder he is always willing to be a listening ear if needed. He stayed in Cascade High School throughout the day to visit classrooms and have lunch.

 

 

  #JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

 

 

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – #MentalHealthExperts to Talk About Helping Suicide Survivors

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

 

MACON, Ga. — How to help suicide survivors — that’s what Kindred Hospice and Coliseum Health System will talk about on April 11 at Riverside United Methodist Church in Macon.

The event will kick off with breakfast at 8:30 a.m. A psychiatrist with Coliseum Health will talk about how to help suicide survivors afterwards.

Organizers said they hope the event brings in pastors, chaplains, fire and police officials, educators, medical personnel, social workers, and others who can benefit from learning more about suicide prevention.

The event is free but registration is required before April 9, 2019. Anyone interested can contact Franchetta Trawick with Coliseum Medical Centers at franchetta.trawick@hcahealthcare.com or 478-464-1401.

Anyone who is in a crisis and needs help can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or chat with someone on their website.

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – #Suicide Deaths of #MassShooting Survivors Raise Questions Experts Can’t Yet Answer

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

 

People attend a one-year anniversary memorial service for victims of the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida. Two survivors of the tragedy recently died by suicide.

People attend a one-year anniversary memorial service for victims of the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida. Two survivors of the tragedy recently died by suicide.
The recent #suicide deaths of #SydneyAiello and #CalvinDesir, survivors of last year’s mass shooting in #Parkland, Florida, unleashed collective grief online as the public mourned the loss of two teenagers who’d endured an unthinkable tragedy.That grief was only compounded when the #Newtown, Connecticut, police confirmed Monday that #JeremyRichman, a father who’d lost his 6-year-old daughter in the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, died in an apparent suicide.

There are no simple explanations when someone dies by #suicide; numerous risk factors, like easy access to lethal means, barriers to #mentalhealthtreatment, and a history of #mentalillness, can increase the likelihood that someone will take their own life. But these deaths forced the public to confront the potential ripple effects of surviving a mass shooting, which has led to calls for increased research on how survivors fare over the course of their lives.

While numerous studies have attempted to answer this question in recent decades, yielding important insights about the #mentalhealth of shooting survivors, researchers haven’t systematically looked at whether #massshootings make someone more likely to attempt #suicide.

“We just don’t have the kinds of studies that really inform us as to what the predictors are and who’s most at risk,” says Barbara J. Coffey, division chief of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Coffey’s division provided free counseling to #Parkland shooting survivors and community members last year, and has announced plans to offer formal assessments and treatment to youth following the #suicides. She has studied #suicide in adolescents and stresses the importance of effective treatment in reducing the risk of deadly self-harm.

Aiello graduated from the school last year, and her mother told CBS Miami that the 19-year-old experienced survivor’s guilt and had recently been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. Less is known about Desir’s exposure to the shooting and the recovery challenges he faced.

Just being exposed to shooting-related trauma could’ve increased the teens’ #suicide risk. In general, some form of #anxiety or #PTSD can be a risk factor for #suicidal thoughts or behavior, and combining that with other factors, like #depression, lack of family cohesion, recent relationship problems, or #traumaticchildhoodexperiences like sexual abuse would certainly “render children vulnerable to #suicide,” says Coffey. Her own research indicated that, among other factors, a teenager’s level of hopelessness about the future was closely associated with attempting #suicide.

While we don’t know much about the risk of #suicide for mass shooting survivors, some researchers are trying to learn more about the complex ways such trauma affects a survivor’s mental health. Research does show that the majority of people who survive trauma, disaster, or mass violence ultimately recover from the experience.

Heather Littleton, a professor in the department of psychology at East Carolina University, says that research can be hard to generalize too because mass shooting events aren’t identical. Some happen in close quarters or have fewer victims, while others, like the Pulse nightclub shooting or the Las Vegas music festival shooting, happen in larger spaces and claim many more lives. Shootings can also prompt different community responses.

Littleton’s study of Virginia Tech shooting survivors, for example, found that nearly a quarter of participants reported PTSD symptoms a year later. A study of people who survived a mass shooting almost a year later at Northern Illinois University found a much lower rate of PTSD after several months — 12 percent — among participants.

The notable differences between the two events could’ve played a part in different rates of PTSD for survivors, says Littleton. The Virginia Tech shooting took place in different locations across campus, leaving 32 people dead and numerous injured. It also became the subject of nonstop media coverage. The NIU shooting happened in a lecture hall and led to five victim’s deaths and more than a dozen injuries.

Littleton’s study of a subset of Virginia Tech survivors — those who experienced sexual trauma prior to the event — adds to the research, indicating that previous trauma can deepen one’s vulnerability to psychological distress following a shooting.

“[There’s the idea] that trauma shatters your ideas about the world,” says Littleton. “But for other folks, it’s confirming the negative beliefs you already had. You might think, ‘I’m a person that bad things happen to,’ or ‘I’m not capable of stopping bad things.’ A new trauma just serves to reinforce and confirm those beliefs.”

“The initial loss begets more loss and spirals.”

Littleton says there’s also a theory that the more a trauma results in “resource loss,” diminishing one’s ability to cope with traumatic grief, the more difficult it is to recover. And the more that survivors lose optimism in the future, the more likely they are to experience PTSD.

“The initial loss begets more loss and spirals,” says Littleton, who emphasizes that it’s common and normal for survivors to feel like they’ve overcome their struggles only to suddenly find themselves experiencing negative mood changes or resurgent PTSD symptoms.

“It’s never too late to need help, and it doesn’t mean something is wrong with you,” she says.

Littleton would like to see more funding to support evidence-based interventions for those affected by mass shootings. Currently, communities often improvise ways to help survivors, their loved ones, and the bereaved. She’d also like for grant-making organizations, including government agencies, to find ways to quickly fund researchers so they can start designing studies and collecting data within hours or days of a mass shooting, as opposed to months or years.

Sandro Galea, dean of Boston University School of Public Health, said in a tweet this week that the mental health of shooting survivors is “a clear area for action and research.”

Galea previously called for a national registry that would include fatal and nonfatal firearm injuries, similar to the The World Trade Center Health Registry, which has tracked the health effects of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack in New York City. Researchers could use such a database on firearm deaths and injuries to glean insights about what happens to survivors over a long period of time. In an email to Mashable, he reiterated his support for a registry in the wake of the suicides.

While the research that’s been done on the #mentalhealth of survivors has led to important insights, the suicide deaths of Aiello, Desir, and Richman are a tragic reminder that we simply don’t know enough about what survival looks like for the rest of someone’s life once they’ve lived through a mass shooting.

If you want to talk to someone or are experiencing suicidal thoughts, text the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Here is alist of international resources.

Good Health is Mental Health

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – Overcoming the #Stigma of #MentalIllness in #CommunitiesofColor

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

 

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Michelle Morales, 22, struggles with #depression but feels as if her mother is more worried about her physical health than #emotionalhealth.

“My mom would kind of mock me and say, ‘Oh, don’t talk to her. She’s #depressed.’ She would see it as a joke or confuse it for laziness,” said Michelle Morales, who lives in the South Central neighborhood of Los Angeles.

Experts say Morales is not alone. Nearly 10 percent of #Latino and #African-Americans have an “unmet need” for #mentalhealthservices, according to Rand Health Care. However, one of the barriers preventing others like Morales to seek help is the #stigma of #mentalillness in those communities, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

#Mentalillness is either considered a taboo or an affliction that can be cured with a change in attitude. Hispanic parents often say things like, “You don’t have #depression: You’re just lazy,” “Cleaning will help your #depression. You just need to stay busy,” or “You’re not sad. You just need attention.”

Hispanics are significantly more at risk for #mentalhealth problems than some other groups. #TheAmericanPsychiatricAssociation also reported that close to 19 percent of Hispanic high school students had seriously considered #suicide; over 15 percent made a plan to attempt suicide; 11.3 percent had attempted #suicide, and 4.1 percent had a #suicide attempt that led to the need for medical attention.

Sadly, some Hispanic families don’t learn the importance of #mentalhealth until it is too late.

“It had to take my cousin’s #suicide for my extended family to realize how important it is to address issues pertaining to #mentalhealth,” said Erick Ponce-Furlos, 21, a student at UC Berkeley who is from South Central L.A.

He added that his family know a lot more now and make concerted efforts to check up on each other, including calling and helping him when he’s stressed out with schoolwork.

Therapy can help, as it did for Frida Ramirez, 20, when she learned she has a generalized #anxiety disorder. But some of her family members’ reactions made things worse, she said.

“It was hard to hide,” Ramirez said about her symptoms, which started in middle school. At first, she attributed the symptoms to #stress from her Advanced Placement classes and homework.

Ramirez said, “When I had mild symptoms, I never thought it was worth mentioning because I thought I was just overreacting. [That’s] what people would tell me, mainly my family.”

Fortunately, she got help — though since losing her insurance, she hasn’t been able to afford therapy.

Resources for those struggling with #mentalillness include the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which has a 24-7 hotline, 800-273-8255, and NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill)- South Central Los Angeles, which is at 1720 E. 120th St. Los Angeles CA 90059. The local NAMI group can be reached at (310) 668-4272.

 

 

 

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – #Suicide: An Uncomfortable but Necessary Conversation

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

 

13 documentaries

My process for dealing was twofold: For a year and a half, I helped every person I came across who seemed like they were struggling – sometimes to my own detriment. I had to begin asking the question, “At what point does my responsibility for this person end and their own begin?”

Part one of a multi-part series 

I have a friend who lost nearly her entire family to #suicide within two years: her brother, then her mother, followed by her father. Gloria Johnson, another friend, and my mentor since college lost one of her twin boys. It’s been 12 years since she lost her son, and the tears still fall.

These friends are remarkable women – with a rare level of kindness and wisdom. Resilience is a mysterious force. I always looked at them with reverence and the persistent question in the back of my mind: But how did YOU survive that?

My question was fitting. The #AmericanPsychologicalAssociation states that surviving the #suicide death of a loved one is psychologically at par with surviving a concentration camp. Think about that for a minute. Imagine Auschwitz and Dachau: the horrors seen; the starvation; dysentery and death.

A year and a half ago, I found myself in the throes of my greatest loss and gauntlet thus far in life.

Someone for whom I cared a great deal was 800 miles away and contacted me to say he wasn’t going to make it for Thanksgiving – because he wasn’t going to be alive. I was at work, with a weak signal and trying to process his cryptic messages. Then, I was attempting with every fiber of my being – with the power of words – to keep him alive; to make him want to live.

His response was, “I’m tired, Jana.” He killed himself as violently and efficiently as he had taken out insurgents during his service in the military.

Teen Depressed Talk

The friend I lost to #suicide had #PostTraumaticStressDisorder. We’d talked about it. Fifteen years of warfare left an indelible mark. He expressed his jealousy of the soldiers of World War II because they traveled home by ship and had more time to process things.

From a foreign country, surrounded by combatants, killing a selected target to back in the civilian world strolling down the street at a farmer’s market a day later: modern warfare allows no time for processing. I foolishly believed he had mastered his #PTSD since he was able to discuss it – and was painfully wrong.

Was losing him in that way akin to surviving a concentration camp? I don’t know. How could I know? I do know that guilt is a powerful thing. Uncertain of the depths to which I would travel with mourning, I took my gun to a friend’s house for safe keeping.

As predicted, the waves of dark water came and did not subside for some time: anguished nights alone in a cabin, sorting through my own psyche, hikes in the woods while crying. I had an extensive support network, but the unwillingness to engage most of them.

Recently, friend Gloria and I found ourselves discussing how even the simplest acts, like showering or eating, took so much effort in the early days of our losses. She has a friend who saw her raw pain and lives to this day despite suicidal tendencies. It was a wake-up call for him. He didn’t want to put her or his loved ones through that kind of torture.

My parents insisted I move home. I told them that wouldn’t help anything. A few key friends gracefully and gratefully helped bring me through.

My process for dealing was twofold: For a year and a half, I helped every person I came across who seemed like they were struggling – sometimes to my own detriment. I had to begin asking the question, “At what point does my responsibility for this person end and their own begin?”

That question is still a struggle for me. It was the emotional way of dealing – the “I-can’t-go-through-this-again” approach. With two parents in the sciences, I also confronted the staggering reality of that loss with a level of analysis: research, research, research – seek to understand.

Necessity is driving a conversation on the international stage with various subgroups of people seeming most vulnerable: veterans, bullied children, men over 65 years old, LGBTQ, people struggling with employment, etc. Numbers are up.

A few examples of the dire data: 54 percent of people who died by #suicide did not have a known #mentalhealthcondition according to the #NationalAllianceonMentalIllness. There was an 80 percent uptick in Army veteran #suicide between 2004 to 2008, according to the Mayo Clinic. Deaths by #suicide tripled in Special Operations units, according to CNN reporting. Teenage #suicide saw a 70 percent increase from 2006 to 2016 according to the #CentersforDiseaseControlandPrevention.

We have more desperate friends and family in our midst than ever before. Some wear their scars visibly. Others, like the guy I lost, seem so together that the loss of them is shocking to the system.

One positive outcome from all that pain – the only positive outcome, that I can see, is that vulnerability allowed for the connection. There have been so many real conversations in my life the last year and a half: masks fully lifted; sharing; understanding. I was exposed to the best and the worst of humankind, but usually the best. I found myself in cafes, coffee shops, on hikes and on airplanes talking about it with friends and strangers because it was all I could do.

One such conversation occurred with Big Sky local and CEO of Big Sky Chamber, Candace Carr Strauss who lost two close family members to suicide. One of those family members was her 19-year-old nephew. She believes it shouldn’t be a taboo topic. She doesn’t want other families to suffer staggering and needless loss. Friends, family and community members should not exist without hope. We are in agreement that the community needs to talk about it and find solutions.

Piece by piece, I have built myself and my life back. I learned painful lessons from that loss which I believe subsequently helped save the lives of two other friends.

There are things we can do of which many of us are unaware. We will be confronting this topic in the Lookout in the coming weeks; deep-diving into the research and science behind it; interviewing first responders and #mentalhealthprofessionals, and creating a plan for if you get that call or text from a loved one threatening #suicide. We will have the discussion of how this is impacting our community directly and what steps community leaders are taking to address it.

I have no doubt that reading this series will be uncomfortable. Yet, I also have no doubt that shining a light on this – starting this conversation – is vitally important.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

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#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth -#Parkland Shooting Survivor #SydneyAiello Died by #Suicide After Allegedly Struggling With #Survivor’sGuilt

This is just tragic!!!

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

 

A teen survivor of the mass shooting at #MarjoryStonemanDouglasHighSchool in #Parkland, Fla., has died by #suicide.

Nineteen-year-old #SydneyAiello took her life over the weekend, mom Cara Aiello told Tampa news station WFLA, after suffering from #survivor’sguilt and #post-traumaticstressdisorder (#PTSD). Sydney was at school on February 14, 2018, when a gunman opened fire, killing 17 people.  She was reportedly close friends with student Meadow Pollack, who died that day.

Cara, who did not return Yahoo Lifestyle’s request for comment, told WFLA that Sydney had difficulty in school because she was scared to sit in class. However, she didn’t seek help.

On Wednesday, a GoFundMe page was created by Brett and Blair Israel, friends of the Aiello family, to pay for her funeral. So far, it’s raised almost $8,000. “#SydneyAiello was born on January 27th, 2000,” read the fundraiser. “She was welcomed into this world by her loving family: her parents Cara and Joe, and her brother Nick.”

#SydneyAiello, a teen who survived the 2018 shooting at #MarjoryStonemanDouglasHighSchool in #Parkland, Florida died by #suicide after suffering from #survivor’sguilt and #PTSD

“Sydney spent 19 years writing her story as a beloved daughter, sister, and friend to many,” the Israels wrote. “She lit up every room she entered.  She filled her days cheerleading, doing yoga, and brightening up the days of others. Sydney aspired to work in the medical field helping others in need.  On March 17th, 2019 Sydney became the guardian angel to many.”

They concluded, “It was a privilege to have you in our lives. Sydney, we will miss you and always love you. May you find peace in His arms.”

Neither the Israels or representatives of #MarjoryStonemanDouglasHighSchool and the Broward County Public Schools district responded to Yahoo Lifestyle interview requests.

Ryan Petty, whose daughter Alaina died in the massacre, told WFLA, “It breaks my heart that we’ve lost yet another student from Stoneman Douglas.” Petty urged parents to check in on their children, asking questions like, “Have you thought of killing yourself and have you had any intention of acting on those thoughts?”

Julie Cerel, PhD., a licensed psychologist at the University of Kentucky and president of the American Association of Suicidology tells Yahoo Lifestyle that research on #survivor’sguilt is scarce due to sensitivity factors toward victims. However, post-traumatic stress syndrome is one risk factor for suicide, because it forces victims to mentally relive the trauma.

According to the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide, feeling burdensome, isolated, and having a low threshold for death, are drivers of suicide. “Experiencing any of these demotivates someone to get help,” Cerel tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “Especially if they’re involved in a public trauma with the whole world watching.”

If you or someone you know are experiencing #suicidalthoughts, call 911, or call the #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text HOME to the Crisis Text Line at 741741.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

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#JamesDonaldsononCBDOilandBenefits – #CBD Oil Emerging as an Effective Chronic #PainManagement in the Current Time

the bodys endocanabanoid system

Cures for certain illnesses have not yet been discovered, however, what is worse is the pain that comes with some of them. “#Chronicpain” can be loosely defined as one that prevails for more than 12 weeks and refuses to die down. Research has failed to produce any form of medicine that specifically targets it and in some cases, the cause or origin of pain is not identifiable. #CBDoil is quickly emerging to be the most popular drug in the current time, at least when it comes to the alleviation of pain caused by certain diseases.

Click Here For Additional Information on CBD Oil and Products

Democratic governments have tried, time and again, to drown out the voices of the majority and impose views, that they deem socially acceptable, upon the general populace. This began when the United States banned alcohol (1920-1933) and failed miserably, where ironically gangs and bars (then secret in nature) increased in size and crime rates rose to an all-time high. The lift of the ban brought along with it more progressive policies which gave rise to a flood of new ideas. People were now ready to embrace the very things that had terrified them in the past.

This fits in quite well with the youth culture of that time (the hippie culture) that became popular in the 1960s. “Pot”, for lack of better words, became the drug of the decade. #Celebrities and bands such as #BobMarley and #PinkFloyd (respectively) transformed the nation with their new age ideologies that stemmed from psychedelics, getting “high” and the culture that followed.

However, there did prevail a certain group in society, the thoughts of which did not parallel those of the aforementioned. Mostly Catholics, these people firmly believed in the fact that the youth of the time was destroying the values that the United States was built upon. These groups exist, even today.

Right around the time that marijuana started gaining popularity, people started extracting from the plant in several different ways and experimenting upon themselves in hopes that something would work. Thus emerged medical marijuana, #CBD (#cannabidiol) oil and many other kinds of versions of cannabis that people swore by. This led to massive appeals towards the legalisation of medical marijuana, solely for those that could not live a normal life without it.

Contrary to popular belief, #CBD oil does not contain the ability to get one “high” as it (most of the time) does not contain #THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the chemical that produces the feelings associated with cannabis. It is extracted from the cannabis plant, however, it falls under the category of hemp more so.

Click Here For Additional Information on CBD Oil and Products

#Pain associated with #arthritis, chemotherapy, nervous system disorders, and many others can be treated with over the counter medication.

Some people, however, experience no difference even after ingesting recommended dosages. They even start experiencing side effects to some extent. #CBDoil serves to alleviate the same pain and uses less aggressive means to do so, all at the same time.

#Cannabidiol is believed to target the #endocannabinoid system within the body. This system is responsible for communication that occurs between cells, part of which affects the way we feel pain.

Most of the studies conducted on animals (such as those in the journal “Pain” in 2017) discovered that ingesting #CBD orally affects pain receptors far less than applying it onto localized areas. Rats with #osteoporosis thus experienced alleviated pain after its administration. Numerous other studies have pointed to the benefits of #CBDoil. More importantly, millions of people around the world swear by it.

Years of wandering from doctor to doctor (quite a few of which refused to believe them) has ended for some as they have resorted to #cannabidiol which has finally served to, at least partially, relieve some of the symptoms of the disease that they were born with and have to, unfortunately, live with for the rest of their life.

The regulation of #cannabidiol manufacturers, however, is necessary as one can never really be sure what goes into the drugs that are bought off the counter and consulting a cannabis expert or doctor is always suggested when one decides to change medication or switch to a new drug, regardless of its nature.

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