Leave a comment

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – SUICIDE WATCH #Suicide Rates In #Girls Soar 83% With Those As Young As TEN Taking Their Lives

SUICIDE rates in young girls have reached record levels, shocking new figures out today have revealed.

Figures from the Official for National Statistics show that #suicides in #females aged 10 to 24 have soared by 83 per cent in six years.

 Suicide rates in young people have reached record levels, new figures today revealed
Suicide rates in young people have reached record levels, new figures today revealed

The figures also show that in 2018, rates among boys in the same age group were up 25 per cent from the previous year.

But men remain at the highest risk – particularly those aged from 45 to 49 – and continue to account for three quarters of all suicides in 2018.

Last year The Sun launched the You’re Not Alone campaign, to remind those in the grips of mental illness that there is hope and to encourage people to watch out for the warning signs a loved one could be in trouble.

Big life events, like a death in the family, divorce and redundancy can leave people feeling vulnerable and trigger mental health issues.

Mental health charities warned girls were struggling with pressures at school, concerns about body image and relationships.

They called for more investment in NHS mental health services, so kids can get help before they reach “crisis point”.

The latest figures show that in England, suicide among men is up 14 per cent with significant increases in the North East and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Last year, there were 6,507 suicides registered in the UK in total – an increase of 11 per cent from 2017.

Following several years of decline, the latest UK suicide rate has now increased to the level seen when it previously peaked in 2013.

Scotland had the highest suicide rate per 100,000 people, followed by Wales and England.

The ONS said that the “exact reasons” for the rise are unknown but changes made in the last year to the way coroners record such deaths may be a factor.

In July 2018 the standard of proof used by coroners to determine whether a death was a suicide was lowered.

The key signs your loved one is at risk of suicide

There are several warning signs that a person is at risk of suicide. But it’s vital to know that they won’t always be obvious.

While some people are quite visibly in pain and become withdrawn and depressed, others may continue their life as normal pretending everything is fine.

Look out for subtle personality changes in friends and family, especially if you know they have been going through a tough time, Lorna told The Sun Online.

These are the key signs to watch out for:

  1. A change in routine, such as sleeping or eating less than normal
  2. Struggling to sleep, lacking energy or appearing particularly tired
  3. Drinking, smoking or using drugs more than usual
  4. Finding it hard to cope with everyday things
  5. Not wanting to do things they usually enjoy
  6. Becoming withdrawn from friends and family – not wanting to talk or be with people
  7. Appearing more tearful
  8. Appearing restless, agitated, nervous, irritable
  9. Putting themselves down in a serious or jokey way, for example ‘Oh, no one loves me’, or ‘I’m a waste of space’
  10. Losing interest in their appearance, not liking or taking care of themselves or feeling they don’t matter

Nick Stripe, head of health analysis and life events at ONS, said: “We saw a significant increase in the rate of deaths registered as suicide last year which has changed a trend of continuous decline since 2013.

“While the exact reasons for this are unknown, the latest data show that this was largely driven by an increase among men who have continued to be most at risk of dying by suicide.

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle



 

“In recent years, there have also been increases in the rate among young adults, with females under 25 reaching the highest rate on record for their age group.

“Looking at the overall trend since the early 80s, we are still witnessing a gradual decline in the rate of suicide for the population as a whole.

“We will continue to monitor the recent increase, to help inform decision makers and others that are working to protect vulnerable people at risk.”

Urgent health issue

Campaigners have warned that the rise in suicide rates is an “urgent public health issue”.

Samaritans boss Ruth Sutherland said: “Every single one of these deaths is a tragedy that devastates families, friends and communities.

“Whilst the overall rise has only been seen this year, and we hope it is not the start of a longer-term trend, it’s crucial to have a better understanding of why there has been such an increase.

Suicide is not inevitable, it is preventable and encouraging steps have been made but we need to look at suicide as a serious public health issue Ruth SutherlandSamaritans

“We know that suicide is not inevitable, it is preventable and encouraging steps have been made to prevent suicide, but we need to look at suicide as a serious public health issue.”

She added that the rising rate of suicide among young people is a “particular concern” and more needs to be done to ensure this generation doesn’t carry a higher risk of suicide throughout their lives.

“A major concern for Samaritans is the increase in self-harm among young people over the last 15 years, particularly in young women,” she said.

YOU’RE NOT ALONE

EVERY 90 minutes in the UK a life is lost to suicide.

It doesn’t discriminate, touching the lives of people in every corner of society – from the homeless and unemployed to builders and doctors, reality stars and footballers.

It’s the biggest killer of people under the age of 35, more deadly than cancer and car crashes.

And men are three times more likely to take their own life than women.

Yet it’s rarely spoken of, a taboo that threatens to continue its deadly rampage unless we all stop and take notice, now.

That is why The Sun launched the You’re Not Alone campaign.

The aim is that by sharing practical advice, raising awareness and breaking down the barriers people face when talking about their mental health, we can all do our bit to help save lives.

Let’s all vow to ask for help when we need it, and listen out for others… You’re Not Alone.

If you, or anyone you know, needs help dealing with mental health problems, the following organisations provide support:

“Self-harm is a strong risk factor for future suicide among young people.

“Research is urgently needed to understand this increase in self-harm so that effective support services and preventive measures can be developed.

“Self-harm must also be prioritised by governments and plans should equip young people with effective, healthy coping mechanisms and promote help-seeking by reducing #stigma around self-harm.”

Children and young people’s mental health charity YoungMinds says an “urgent” new government strategy is needed.

Tom Madders, campaigns director at the charity, said: “We urgently need a new government strategy which looks at the factors that are fuelling the crisis in young people’s mental health and which ensures that anyone who’s struggling to cope can get early support.”

He added: “The reasons why young people feel suicidal are often complex, but we know that traumatic experiences at a young age – like bereavement, bullying or abuse – can have a huge impact on mental health.

Traumatic experiences at a young age – like bereavement, bullying or abuse – can have a huge impact on mental health. Tom MaddersYoungMinds

“School pressure, concerns about how you look and difficult relationships with family or friends can also have a significant effect.

“We’re seeing some much-needed investment in NHS #mentalhealthservices – but we need much more action to ensure young people can get early help, long before they reach crisis point.”

In response, Cllr Ian Hudspeth, chairman of the local government association’s community wellbeing board, said: “Suicide prevention is a public health priority for local government and every council has a #suicide prevention plan in place.

“Councils are already working closely with schools, railway operators, businesses, hospitals and the police to prevent #suicide and help those affected by it.”

Campaigners are also calling better support for men’s health after the figures also revealed that three in four #suicides last year were #males.

Brendan Maher, Global Director for #MentalHealthandSuicidePrevention at Movember, said: “The significant rise in the number of #men taking their own lives is one of the biggest public health challenges of our time.

“#Males continue to account for three in four #suicides, with the highest rates recorded among those aged 45 to 49.

Photo by bruce mars on Pexels.com
Leave a comment

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – #SuicidePrevention Month: Your Worth Isn’t Measured By The Markets

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Tyne Morgan

As the various factors in agriculture weighs on producers, conversations surrounding #mentalhealthandsuicideawareness are becoming more common, as experts and others try to remove the #stigma around #mentalhealth. ( Farm Journal )

Farmers, ranchers and producers have taken an emotional rollercoaster ride in 2019. Between the trade war and relentless weather, producer outlooks are waning.

The latest Ag Economy Barometer, released by Purdue University and the CME Group,showed a dramatic downturn in producer sentiments, with the August reading falling to 124. The August reading is a 29-point drop from July.

The emotional toll of farming today is weighing on many farmers and ranchers. This is sparking serious conversations about #suicide and #mental health in an industry that the #CentersforDiseaseControl states has a suicide rate of double that of the general population.

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle



 

When the unthinkable happens

Katie Lyons grew up on an Illinois farm and saw first-hand how depression can change farm families. 

“When I was younger, he was always out playing with us in the yard having fun,” said Lyons, reflecting on what it was like growing up with her father on the farm. “We used to go swimming and do a lot of different activities and I try to hold those memories close because that’s all I’ve got left.”

Today, Lyons clinches onto pictures and memories of her father, after the unthinkable changed their family forever.

“My dad decided to take his life in 2013 after a long bout of depression and #anxiety on the farm, so it’s definitely had an impact on my life,” she said.

Lyons said #depression was something her dad battled for years, but when they would address it, she said her dad didn’t want to discuss what was going on.

“It just gradually got worse and worse and worse, to the point where he just couldn’t do it anymore,” said Lyons. “He decided that the only option was to take his life.”

That day took Lyons’ life on a sharp turn and she knew she had to make something good out of so much heartache.

“It wasn’t until after that happened that I realized how important it was and that we really should have had a lot of have stronger, different conversations than what we had been having leading up to it,” she said.

Ag is different

Adrienne DeSutter is a farm wife, a mom and specializes in behavioral heath, specifically in agriculture wellness. She said while #mentalhealth has many #stigmas, agriculture is unique.

“Farmers are some of the best caregivers in the world,” said DeSutter. “They care for crops, they care for land and they care for their animals, but they’re not always the best caregivers of themselves.”

DeSutter said farmers are naturally selfless, ambitious individuals who rarely rely on others to fix something wrong on the farm, that makes it hard to reach out when they need help with issues like #depression.

“They’re excellent at recognizing when an animal needs some intervention, but they’re self-reliant,” she said. “They want to do things themselves—they want to be the fixers and find the find the solutions.”

Know the signs

Both Lyons and DeSutter say there are warning signs to watch when it comes to #mentalhealth and someone possible considering taking their own life.

“He’d become very detached,” said Lyons talking about her father. “He’d taken himself out of a lot of different organizations that he’d previously been involved with. He didn’t get he didn’t do a lot of extracurricular activities. It was basically go to work, come home, go to bed type activities.”

DeSutter said those signs or changes in behavior are different person-to-person.

“This is not a secret formula, she said. “This is not something that looks the same for everyone. We’re just looking for something that has changed, or multiple things that have changed. Specifically, at the farm, you might find, you know that that livestock is being cared for less or that you might see things looking a little more rundown than normal.”

DeSutter said if any of these signs are starting to creep into the picture, the first step is to ask your primary care physician for help. The doctor can then refer you on to a specialist.

She said there are also other steps an individual can take to help improve the situation and relieve the #stress and burden caving in.

“Just expand your life beyond agriculture,” she said. “Find a book club or find a card club or have some friends that aren’t related to agriculture, just so that you can have a break, because that’s the uniqueness of farming is it’s a career, but it’s a lifestyle too.”

September is #SuicidePreventionAwarenessMonth; a topic becoming much more widely talked about in agriculture today.

It’s also an initiative Bayer’s Acceleron seed treatment brand launched this year, called “Farm State of Mind.”

“We look at #mentalhealth, and we look at stressors in agriculture is kind of that elephant in the room really,” said A.J. Hohmann, marketing manager for Bayer seed growth. “Let’s talk about it; let’s try to remove that negative stigma that’s associated with #mentalhealth in agriculture, and let’s just start the conversation. Let’s try to find inspiration for others who are maybe dealing with stress and #mentalhealth of their own.”

He said Acceleron is partnering with #mentalhealth experts and dedicated a website to the topic. It provides advice and tools to help navigate through such a tough situation.

“We want folks to talk about it,” said Hohmann. “We want to remove that stigma associated with mental health, and is that going to happen overnight? No, absolutely not. Is that going to happen just during the planting season, throughout the growing season? No, this is something we needed to be talking about year-round.”

Acceleron is inviting farmers to share their stories on Twitter, using #farmstateofmind.

Start the conversation

The growing awareness surrounding #mentalhealth was also on the mind of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue during Farm Progress Show last week in Illinois.

“Any time there’s economic stress in the ag community or any sector, there’s anxiety,” he said. “There’s emotional distress, and it affects families and it affects communities.”

The open conversations about #mentalhealth and #suicide within agriculture is a welcomed change for Lyons, who is still coping with the loss of her father.

“It’s hard because there’s a huge #stigma around #mentalhealth,” she said. “We think it’s a weakness or something is wrong with us, but it’s a true medical condition. It’s just like cancer, just like anything else out there that we have going on with us. Sometimes we have to get help. And it’s, it’s hard to admit that sometimes. I want to make sure people know there’s resources out there, because I don’t want this to happen to another farm family.”

Remember You Matter 

As the weight of challenges in agriculture get heavier, DeSutter has one plea: remember you matter.

“If you are sitting at home right now, and you feel like #depression is overwhelming you and you feel that sense of worthlessness and that sense of hopelessness, I just need you to know that your worth is not measured by the markets,” she said. “It’s not measured by your farm. You are a valuable person and what your mind is telling you right now that you’re a burden, that’s a lie. That’s a condition that’s taking over, and that’s your brain that needs some help. So, I just urge you to reach out talk to anyone that will listen.”

Those sentiments are something Lyons echoes, as loved ones left behind continue to grieve for years after a loved one is gone.

“My family went through a lot and still goes through a lot today,” she said. “It’s not something that just goes away, when you figure out how to live your life, we’re continually grieving even six years later, and so I want people to know that there are ways to get help, and there are resources out there and options so you don’t have to go down this path.”

Lyons said after her dad died, her family was forced to make some really tough decisions on the farm. They even sold portions of the farm, and at a more manageable level, her brother and family are still farming today.

She said knowing when it’s time to walk away is what helps keep her family going, as well as remembering to enjoy the little things in life.

Photo by Tom Fisk on Pexels.com
Leave a comment

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – #Suicides Of Two #MentalHealthAdvocates In A Week Serve As A Grim Reminder

This week, the deaths of pastor #JarridWilson and #GregoryEells, head of #mentalhealth services at UPenn, highlighted an alarming reality for those in #mentalhealth.

Image: Gregory Eells, head of counseling and psychological services at University of Pennsylvania, and Jarrid Wilson, a megachurch pastor who promoted mental health, died by suicide this week.

Gregory Eells, head of counseling and psychological services at University of Pennsylvania, and Jarrid Wilson, a megachurch pastor who promoted mental health, died by suicide this week.

Psychotherapist #StaceyFreedenthal had helped many people overcome suicidal thoughts before she attempted to take her own life.

Freedenthal, in her 20s at the time and pursuing her master’s degree in social work, had been a volunteer at a suicide prevention hotline. When callers phoned her in crisis, she used her training and education to help.

Stacey Freedenthal
Stacey Freedenthal.Salvador Armendariz

But at the same time, the #depression she had struggled with herself on-and-off for more than a decade was worsening. The advice she gave to others contemplating ending their lives didn’t seem applicable to her. One night in January 1996, six months after she finished her volunteer position at the hotline, she tried to kill herself.

“Nobody is immune from suicide,” including #mentalhealthprofessionals, said Freedenthal, who is now an associate professor at the University of Denver graduate school of social work and the creator of SpeakingofSuicide.com, a suicide prevention website.

“The message can be good and true and inspirational, but that doesn’t mean the messenger is immune to the same challenges as everybody else.”

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle



 

This week, two suicides highlighted that grim reality: The suicides of Gregory Eells, the head of counseling and psychological services at the University of Pennsylvania, and Jarrid Wilson, a California megachurch pastor who was an outspoken #mentalhealthadvocate.

The two worked in different circles and did not appear to have any connection to each other, but their deaths left many asking the same question: How could individuals who did so much for the #mentalhealth community not have gotten the help they needed themselves?

“The thing about #depression and #anxiety, and other #mentalillnesses or psychiatric conditions, is it typically involves our brains lying to ourselves,” said Julie Cerel, a professor at the University of Kentucky College of Social Work and a past president of the American Association of Suicidology.

“When #depression is telling you you’re not worthy, even if we’re trained to combat those false beliefs in others, it’s really hard to be able to stop and do that for yourself — especially if you’ve been doing that for other people all day.”

“When #depression is telling you you’re not worthy, even if we’re trained to combat those false beliefs in others, it’s really hard to be able to stop and do that for yourself — especially if you’ve been doing that for other people all day.”

In the United States, suicide is on the rise. Experts say multiple factors lead to someone taking their own life and say #suicide can happen to anyone — even the famous and successful, like the celebrities #KateSpade and #AnthonyBourdain.

But many say a #stigma still exists against seeking help for #suicidalthoughts in a place where one would least expect it: in the #mentalhealthprofessional community itself.

“There may be for some people the sense of, ‘I’m a counselor, I know what to do, I help other people all day long, I know how to help myself,'” said Lynn Linde, chief knowledge and learning officer for the American Counseling Association, a not-for-profit dedicated to the counseling profession. “Counselors are so busy giving to others that they don’t always take care of themselves. They may minimize their own issues.”

There can be fear of professional repercussions too, Freedenthal said. Mental health professionals may be seeing a therapist who knows people in the same professional circles as they do, and “even though there’s rules of confidentiality, there’s still fear of that being violated.”

“They also may feel that they’re expected to be stronger,” Freedenthal said.

While Eells and Wilson were not working as #mentalhealthcounselors, it was not clear whether they had sought professional help in the weeks before their deaths or what led to their suicides.

Eells had been at the University of Pennsylvania for six months and had found the job more difficult than he expected, his mother told The Philadelphia Inquirer after his death. The job kept him hundreds of miles away from his wife and family, who were still living in Ithaca, New York, where he had previously worked at Cornell University.

Wilson, a pastor at Harvest Christian Fellowship Church who had founded a Christian organization to help those with #mentalhealth and substance abuse, had been open about a longstanding battle with #depression. Shortly before his death, Wilson tweeted: “Loving Jesus doesn’t always cure #suicidalthoughts. Loving Jesus doesn’t always cure #depression. … But that doesn’t mean Jesus doesn’t offer us companionship and comfort.”

Jared Pingleton, director of #mentalhealthcare and ministry for the American Association of Christian Counselors, said many pastors carry the burdens of those in their churches and ignore their own need for self-care.

“I think many times, pastors feel guilty to take care of their own needs,” he said. “It’s an occupational hazard. By nature, that profession is very, very lonely, very isolated.”

He encouraged pastors to call a toll-free pastoral helpline he created five years ago for confidential Christian counseling.

All the experts said regardless of what position a #mentalhealthadvocate or professional is in, taking care of his or her own mental health is critical to helping others.

Freedenthal added that Eels’ and Wilson’s deaths shouldn’t detract from #suicideprevention.

“It just shows to me how much more we need to fight to learn how to better help people and how to make resources available. That’s what’s hard here. Gregory Eels and Jarrid Wilson, they knew about resources,” she said. “When something like this happens, it humbles me that we’re up against something really big, and we need to work harder.”

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741 or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for additional resources.

Leave a comment

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – ‘We Are Failing’ Our #Student-Athletes In The Way We Talk About #MentalHealth (column)

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Kevin Lawrence, For the York Daily Record

Kevin Lawrence is the head baseball coach at Red Lion High School, a YAIAA basketball official and a social studies teacher at Susquehannock High School. He graduated from Delone Catholic High School in 1993. These are his words:

I am a suicide survivor.

I do not meet the definition for being a suicide survivor. But make no mistake, I am surviving my own #suicidalthoughts. By the grace of God, I have never attempted to take my own life. But I have considered it, pondered it and planned it in my own mind. It is called #suicidalideation and it is only one on a lengthy list of ways that our nation’s growing mental health crisis is manifesting itself.

There are many other ways but, as former Washington State quarterback #TylerHilinski’s own suicide tragically proved again, it is the most tragic and devastating.

I am scared. This is a terrifying revelation to make. I expect people to snicker and judge, laugh and mock. But if even one person reconsiders their opinion on mental health, reevaluates what they think a person with depression “looks like,” or better yet, makes the intentional decision to be more empathetic to another human being, athlete or not, the courage it took for me to publish these paragraphs is worth it.

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle



 

‘We are being silent when we should be shouting’

Red Lion head coach Kevin Lawrence yells out to a batter.

Red Lion head coach Kevin Lawrence yells out to a batter. The Red Lion Lions beat the Dallastown Wildcats, 4-1, during the District III Class 6A semifinals at Spring Grove on Tuesday, May 29, 2018

According to the #NationalAllianceonMentalIllness (NAMI), suicide is the second leading cause of death among Americans ages 10-34. Not impaired driving. Not undiagnosed heart disorders. Not drug overdoses. Suicide. Besides the malignancy of suicide, there are other mental illness that, left untreated, lead directly to death.

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of all #mentalillnesses. While certainly not isolated to student-athletes, negative body image and eating disorders are no less prevalent among athletes. Body image challenges plague not only female athletes but, as a man for whom the struggle is real, males as well. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) reports that 1 in 3 people who are battling an eating disorder is #male.

#NAMI’s research shows that more than one in five American teenagers will experience a serious mental illness before their frontal lobes fully develop in their mid-20s. The #AmericanFoundationforSuicidePrevention reports that suicides among those ages 15-24 — the exact age demographic of high school and college student-athletes — has increased steadily since 2000. Each year, more high school and college aged students are taking their own lives.

But when our young people look around and try to interpret the most complex world teenagers have ever faced, they see groups discouraging them from drinking and driving, clinics providing free heart screenings and speakers cautioning the dangers of drug use. At the very same time, our teenage student-athletes are explicitly being given the wrong message about mental health.

We are telling our student-athletes, “you’re resilient, persevere, work through, be mentally tough.” Those messages are great ones for our student-athletes to hear within the lines of their competitive arenas; outside of those boundaries, they are absolutely the wrong messages. We are giving them catch phrases instead of effective strategies. We are failing. We are being silent when we should be shouting. We are ignoring when we must be engaging.

We are not intentionally making the distinction between what is an appropriate mental approach on the field or court and what is mentally healthy outside the locker room doors.

And no place is this silence more deafening than in America’s high school and college locker rooms. Study upon study shows that athletes are significantly less likely than non-athletes to report when they are having problems and to seek the help they need to address those challenges.

The reasons for this disparity are less obvious than the statistical differences themselves. The reasons matter less than the reality. We have invented this perfect image of the American student-athlete. They have it all —great families, good friends, athletic success, academic accomplishment and positive relationships. We are sending a message to young athletes as early as they can recognize it that they have it all and that they need to do it all.

They don’t. They can’t. It is time that we wake up, speak up and acknowledge that our locker rooms are plagued by the same malevolence found in every other corner and crevice of our society.

#Student-athletes aren’t 10-feet tall and bulletproof

Announcer Kevin Lawrence hikes the ball to his son, 6-year-old Connor Lawrence before the football game at Susquehannock High School Friday, August 31, 2012.

Announcer Kevin Lawrence hikes the ball to his son, 6-year-old Connor Lawrence before the football game at Susquehannock High School Friday, August 31, 2012

We need to banish the notion that our student-athletes are ‘10 feet tall and bulletproof.’ We need to destigmatize #mentalillness. And we absolutely need to create a structure to ensure that competitive athletics teaches all of the right life lessons and supports all of its participants, especially those who need the most support.

American teenagers are facing an existential crisis. And no group is being misfed bad information and taught to misinterpret their emotions more than young athletes. 

Our student-athletes will experience failures and successes. Both are valuable. But as our young athletes learn to make sense of those experiences we need to make sure that we as adults, coaches, fans and parents are aware of their challenges, empathetic to their feelings and sensitive to their needs.

We need to stop acting as though high school and college student-athletes are leading some charmed life simply by virtue of their physical prowess. We need to quit acting as though the result of a football game on Friday night or Saturday afternoon is a harbinger of the life path of any of the student-athletes who played in it. We need to speak up. This is my attempt to open the conversation. 

We don’t make players compete with torn ACLs. But we do make them play through shredded emotions. We don’t expect players with broken collarbones to play. But we expect teenagers with broken spirits to play, and play well. We are providing them with the equipment their sport requires, helmets, sticks and pads, but we aren’t providing them with the tools their lives necessitate.

As quick as we are to buy new equipment, we must be equally committed to teaching our student-athletes coping mechanisms, strategies to build intrapersonal intelligence and instilling in them the courage to speak out.

Celebrating #athletes for who they are

Sarah Pennington has an impulse-control disorder called trichotillomania, a #mentaldisorder involving recurrent, irresistible urges to pull out hair Paul Kuehnel, pkuehnel@ydr.com

I am trying to set the example. I am speaking out. I have multiple diagnoses. I have major #depressive disorder, #anxiety, panic disorder, ADHD and elements of OCD. I coach. I officiate. I struggle. And usually I can cope. But that ability — to cope — is one that I have learned painfully and methodically over the past 21 years.

Not enough of our #student-athletes are learning the same skills. We have fed them a societal farce that they have the perfect life and we expect them to meet our expectations. It is time we meet theirs.

This fall I’m back in the press box at Susquehannock announcing the Warrior football games. This winter I’ll be back on the basketball court and next spring I’ll be back in Red Lion’s baseball dugout coaching. During each season, I’ll watch the successes and failures of our local student-athletes.

Through it all, I hope that you will join me in celebrating the young #men and #women who compete, not for what they accomplish or what they do, but rather for who they are. We all need to join together to support the people beneath the uniforms and not just celebrate the championships they win and the milestones they surpass. We need to applaud their end rushes and their empathy, their crossovers and their coping skills, their headers and their heartaches.

We are facing a #mentalhealth crisis in America. It is being exacerbated by our collective silence. I’m speaking up. Please join me.

If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of #suicide, reach out to the #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

To continue the conversation about how we can destigmatize #mentalillness in the #sports community, to share your own thoughts and experiences, or to invite Kevin to speak to your group, please email him at NOT10feettallandbulletproof@gmail.com.

Leave a comment

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – We Need to Talk About #SuicidePrevention In #India

Indian woman against blue background in sweater
Indian woman against blue background in sweater

India in all its diversity and social complexity also remains a closed Pandora ‘s Box in regards to subjects and issues that its largely conventional society deems taboo. One such issue is mental health and more specifically — suicide.

Surprisingly in India the suicides highlighted by media were those of farmers struggling with financial setbacks and institutional apathy — but what came as a shocker to everybody later was that the biggest segment of suicides in India are its housewives.

They, it seemed, were marginalized within homes that had no access to any of the major suicide prevention interventions, namely:

  • Programs of awareness
  • Proper psychological screening
  • Gatekeeper training
  • Restriction to harmful means like poisons
  • Follow-up care in previous cases of self-harm
  • An official universal helpline
  • Supportive media strategies
  • Pharma-therapeutic and psycho-therapeutic support

Statistics also indicated that a large number of those who died in both men and women were “married,” implying weren’t living alone and were part of a family where they had everyday interactions that could have reflected #suicidalideation, but were never identified or if identified, ignored. In India, rates of suicide among young woman in the age-group of 15 to 29 years are quite high.

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle



 

Related:​ 18 Things to Put in Your Suicide Prevention Kit

Community-based suicide prevention strategies like “Gatekeeper” — a program that trains people to know the signs of suicide — are not developed or prevalent. It basically trains common people to identify warning signs of suicide and also response and referral techniques. The entire training can be completed in a few hours and be imparted online too. Healthcare workers, doctors, police, educators and human resource personnel also lack proper sensitization regarding cases of mental health crisis.

Most importantly, the de-stigmatization of any experience of mental stress, emotional challenges and common mental health hurdles like #anxiety and #depression is missing. People glorify “being strong” and suicide is often referred to as “lack of bravery” or “cowardice.”

Repeated insensitive coverage of such cases in media without any kind of sensitivity displayed in
the choice of words, describing details and choosing images sometimes leads to copycat suicidal behavior too. Especially if the person mentioned in such a story is a celebrity, it might trigger young people, people facing a #mentalillness or people with a history of #suicidalbehavior.

Related:​ I Could Understand Losing My Fingers, but Not My Mental Health

World Suicide Prevention Day 2018 report on the National Health Oortal of India mentions that:

“World Suicide Prevention Day (WSPD) is observed every year on 10th September, which is organized by the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO). The aim of this day is to create awareness among people about the fact that suicide can be prevented.”

According to the World Health Organization, there is one death every 40 seconds due to suicide. In spite effective collaborations with several global suicide prevention programs, the economic and political unrest in India is also causing a lot of people visible emotional distress stemming from obvious reasons like rising unemployment.

The challenges presented by suicidal behavior are plenty in India, but I believe the #stigma, taboo and the cultural barriers that prevent people here form speaking about #mentalhealth are the first major hurdles.

There is an increasing and long-pending demand by all mental health activists for a universal helpline for suicide prevention to be put in place by the Government of #India.

Related:​ What My Friend’s Death Made Me Realize About Suicide Contagion

Let’s hope both the Indian society and the institutions join hands to remove the associated cycle of silence about #suicide and #suicideprevention gains strength in #India soon.

Photo by Manish Dhruw on Pexels.com
Leave a comment

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – #Suicide Rates Are Rising, Especially In #Rural #America

Photo by Céline Chamiot-Poncet on Pexels.com

By Linda Carroll

Suicide rates are on the rise, especially in rural America, according to a study published Friday.

From 1999 to 2016, the rate of suicide among Americans ages 25 to 64 rose by 41 percent, researchers reported in JAMA Network Open. Rates among people living in rural counties were 25 percent higher than those in major metropolitan areas.

A number of factors appear to be driving suicide rates up in rural America, including poverty, low income and underemployment, said lead study author Danielle Steelesmith, a postdoctoral fellow at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center.

“Those factors are really bad in rural areas,” said Steelesmith.

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle



 

The study also found that counties with high levels of social fragmentation — based on the levels of single-person households, unmarried residents and transient residents — and a high percentage of veterans had higher rates of suicide. All of those factors were more pronounced in rural counties.

The presence of more gun shops was also associated with an increase in suicide rates in all counties, except for the most rural ones, the researchers reported.

To take a closer look at suicide rates in America, Steelesmith and her colleagues turned to data from the National Vital Statistics System, a database that includes information on suicide deaths, including year of death, gender, age and county of residence.

The researchers also used information from several other databases, including the U.S. Census, the American Community Survey, County Business Patterns, Area Health Resource Files, and the North American Industry Classification System.

They found that, from 1999 to 2016, there were 453,577 suicides among Americans ages 25 to 64, with the largest proportion occurring during the final three years studied. The majority of those who killed themselves were male (349,082), and suicides were more common among middle-aged adults than younger and older adults.

Counties with the highest risk of suicide were in the West, including in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming; Appalachia, including counties in Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia; and the Ozarks, including counties in Arkansas and Missouri. A “growing American tragedy”

The rise in suicide rates in rural counties is “alarming,” said Oren Miron, a researcher at the Clalit Research Institute in Israel, who also studies suicide rates in collaboration with the Harvard Medical School.

Miron, who wasn’t involved with the new research, said two of the factors identified in the study — high veteran rates and unemployment — “may interact in a dangerous way.”

“If a #veteran returns from deployment to a county without jobs, he might lose hope in rejoining civilian life,” Miron said. “The re-entry to civilian life is a period with high #suicide risk, which raises the need to help veterans from rural counties in getting their first job.”

Special programs, such as job training, might help improve the situation, Steelesmith said.

‘Deaths of despair’ are soaring in the U.S.

#Suicide “is a growing American tragedy,” said Dr. Albert Wu, an internist and a professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “It has become a leading cause of death in the U.S., and is a major public health problem.”

In rural areas, “many of the most pernicious health and social problems intersect,” Wu said.

Lack of access to health care in rural areas further compounds the problem. “Insurance can be a proxy for people’s access to #mentalhealthcare,” Steelesmith said.

Wu agreed. “Lack of health insurance kills people,” he said. “More insurance, including the expansion of Medicaid, could help.”

Still, “the social determinants of health are really important,” said Dr. David Brent, the endowed chair in suicide studies and a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. “You can’t make a dent in these kinds of public health problems without doing something to deal with [those social determinants]. Yes, you can provide more services to impoverished people, but there’s nothing like helping people get out of poverty.”

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741 or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for additional resources.

Photo by Kerry on Pexels.com
Leave a comment

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – The #MentalHealth Effects Of #ClimateChange

#JamesDonaldsononMentalHealth – 


Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.


Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.


Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle



 

By Chloe Reichel

The mental health impacts of climate change range from post-traumatic stress disorder triggered by events such as hurricanes and wildfires to broader existential worries about the future of the planet, according to a literature review forthcoming in Current Opinion in Psychology.

In fact, the review finds that globally, as many as half of the people who survive extreme weather events experience negative mental health outcomes. And the mental health implications of climate change can have social and political consequences, too.

“A lot of the work in climate change, in terms of human impact, has been focused on both acknowledging that climate change exists and coping with the more acute forms of climate change at the present time, like Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas right now,” says lead author Lawrence A. Palinkas, a professor of social policy and health at the University of Southern California. “While responses to acute and immediate extreme weather events, like hurricanes, have been at the forefront, it’s also the longer-term impacts of climate change that are having a significant impact and need to be addressed as well.”

The review identifies recent research on the mental health impacts of climate change for three categories of climate-related events: acute events, long-term changes such as drought, and long-lasting, existentially threatening changes like rising sea levels and temperatures reaching uninhabitable levels. Here are some of the findings highlighted in the review:

  • Mental health effects linked to acute events, which also include heat waves, wildfires and floods, are anxiety, mood disorders, stress, post-traumatic stress disorder, disrupted sleep,  suicide, suicidal ideation and grief.
  • These effects can last for months to years following the event.
  • “Residents of low and middle-income countries are especially vulnerable to these outcomes due to their increased exposure to extreme weather events, high levels of poverty, and lack of access to services,” the authors write.

Young children and adolescents tend to experience more severe mental health impacts and take longer to recover, Palinkas adds.

He notes that while research tends to capture people with clinically diagnosed mental health concerns, a much larger percentage of people have symptoms that require response or treatment but do not meet the criteria for a clinical diagnosis.

Considering long-term climate change, researchers have found that monthly temperature shifts from between 77 F and 86 F to greater than 86 F increased the probability of mental health difficulties by 0.5% in a randomly sampled group of nearly 2 million U.S. adults.

Several studies have linked increased temperatures to higher rates of aggression, criminal behavior and suicide. Heat stress is linked to declines in cognitive functioning due to dehydration.

Heat waves have been shown to exacerbate mental illnesses. Researchers indicate that people with dementia, schizophrenia and substance use disorders are particularly at risk during heat waves. That’s because they might have trouble regulating their body temperature as a side effect of certain psychiatric medications. Also, they might be prone to heat-related cognitive impairment.

Studies in Australia have linked prolonged droughts to psychological distress, anxiety, depression and increased rates of #suicide in rural areas.

Multiple studies have found that rural farmers are especially vulnerable, possibly because of the impact droughts can have on their livelihood. “On the NBC Evening News, there was a piece about the suicide rate among farmers in the United States, which is double that of the rate of the average population,” Palinkas says. “A lot of it has to do with loss of income and the ability to sustain those farms. And while climate change is not the only reason that that is happening, it’s certainly becoming, increasingly, a major contributor to reduced agricultural productivity and loss of income.”

With respect to the existential threats posed by climate change, the review indicates that acknowledging the reality of climate change can lead to distress and anxiety about the future.

“The fact that we know there is such a thing as climate change, but we don’t know the degree to which it’s going to impact us personally, has actually generated increasing levels of anxiety, particularly in younger adults and children, adolescents,” Palinkas says. “They’re the ones who are confronted more by the prospects of long-term impact than their parents or grandparents are.”

Further, despair over the environment can exacerbate the processes of climate change. If, for example, individuals feel that it’s a hopeless cause, they might be less inclined to take action to reduce their environmental impacts.

Lessons for journalists

Palinkas says journalists might be able to take a few lessons from the realm of mental health when considering how to cover climate change and its numerous effects.

First, he urges journalists to draw attention to the mental health issues associated with #climatechange, because awareness is a critical first step in addressing them.

“You cannot promote health and prevent disease in [vulnerable] populations unless you address the mental health issues first, because, unless you do, they simply lack the psychological capacity to change behavior,” Palinkas says. “The same is true with climate change. Unless you address the mental health impacts associated with climate change, it’s hard to get people to work in a proactive manner to either mitigate or adapt to change in climate.”

He also recommends journalists take a page out of the therapist’s playbook when covering climate change, generally.

“I see a parallel between the challenges involved in communicating the risk of climate change to the broader public and the challenges involved in working with clients or patients who have mental health problems, using evidence-based forms of psychotherapy, like problem-solving treatment, for example,” Palinkas explains. “There, the approach is, something is depressing you: Step one is to define what that problem is. Step two is to identify what it is that you can and cannot do to address that problem.”

He continues, “It’s a very practical approach that is really designed to empower people who are experiencing depression or #anxiety. And once you begin to do that, you essentially give them the tools to not only overcome their own feelings of #depression, but to work in a more practical and positive manner.”

For journalists, this means thinking about the two steps in problem-solving treatment — and making sure both are included in their coverage. In other words, he says, journalists should explain how individuals can reduce their impact and adapt to a changing climate.

Palinkas suggests news coverage that sheds light on the mental health effects of climate change and presents solutions. For instance, he suggests highlighting efforts to eliminate #stigma and help vulnerable populations, such as farmers during periods of drought access mental health care. When covering extreme weather events, journalists could highlight how first responders are being trained to deliver mental health interventions. First responders used a mental health risk triage system in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan in 2013.

“This is a way of developing capacity in very low resource settings to address the #mentalhealth needs subsequent to a major natural disaster,” Palinkas says.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
girlvsworldblog.com/

Mental health, beauty, lifestyle, books & everything inbetween

CW Seattle

Home Of CW11

Park Preview

A guide to Seattle area parks with an emphasis on accessibility, photography, and birds.

Damon Ashworth Psychology

Helping people thrive

Blind Injustice

In this blog, I talk about injustice that we struggle to recognize and/or blindly commit.

西雅图中文电台 Chinese Radio Seattle

AM 1150, HD-3 FM 98.9, 手机收听:Chinese Radio Seattle | 西雅图中文电台, 周五到周日每晚7点到12点,周一到周四每晚9点到12点, 微博/微信/Facebook: ChineseRadioSeattle

acadia creative - designwise

Useful tips and tricks on design and marketing for your business

jkburwell

Just another WordPress.com site

markettojapan

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Q13 FOX News

Seattle and Western Washington's source for breaking news, weather, and sports. Home of Washington’s Most Wanted and the Seattle Seahawks.

Weedin 360

Unleashed® Growth & Protection

Official Reuven Carlyle Blog

State Senator from Washington's 36th Legislative District

An Urban Sip Wine Blog

Wine Paired with Life...Think Liquid Nudist Camp

Mike Margolies- The Mental Game

How Sport Psychology Explains the World