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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – 70 Per Cent Patients With #MentalHealth Disorders Contemplated #Suicide During Lockdown, Says Expert

70 per cent patients with mental health disorders contemplated suicide during lockdown, says expert70 per cent patients with #mentalhealthdisorders contemplated #suicide during lockdown, says expert

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Most of the patients were between 25 and 40 of age, and more #men than #women reported the tendency of active ideation
  • About half of the patients do not have any history of #mentalillness in the past
  • Many of the patients are in regular touch with #doctors outside the formal interaction period

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Gurugram: The months-long lockdown to prevent the spread of #COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel #coronavirus, has taken a severe toll on the #mentalhealth of the people, with #doctors observing as many as 70 per cent patients with #mentalhealthdisorders contemplating #suicide during this period. They said the impact is lingering and may take several months to stop #suicideideation.

“As many as 7 out of every 10 patients since the lockdown have said they felt suicidal during the lockdown. There is a clear and sharp rise from the pre-lockdown time when we saw such thoughts in 5 to 7 people out of every 10 patients. This is almost 70 per cent rise from March. The reasons for this rise are many – working professionals mostly complaining of irregular work hours, #stress of work combined with lack of personal space as spouses are working from home. Most of them are living in the city away from their parents and families, and lack of physical meetings with friends and family have increased the #stress and #anxiety levels,” said Dr Shweta Sharma, Consultant Clinical Psychologist, Columbia Asia Hospital, Gurugram.

According to Dr Sharma, most of the patients were between 25 and 40 years of age, with majority of the cases being active ideation, and more #men than #women reported the tendency, which indicates the growing level of #anxiety and #mentalhealthproblems in them. About half of the patients do not have any history of #mentalillness in the past.

“We treat such patients with medicines, counselling, or talking therapies, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Besides, many of these patients are in regular touch outside the formal interaction period such as meetings or teleconferencing. It may take these people several months before they can go back to a healthy mental state,” added Dr Sharma.

Suicidal thoughts, also known as #suicidalideation, refer to a psychological state where the person thinks about #suicide that can range from a detailed plan to a fleeting consideration. However, #suicidalideation does not include the act of #suicide. There are two kinds of #suicidalideation – passive and active. While passive #suicidalideation refers to a state when one wishes themselves to be dead, but do not actually have any plans to commit #suicide while active #suicidalideation is more than thinking about it – those who have active #suicidalideation plan how to do it along with an intent to commit #suicide.

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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – The Importance Of Talking About #MentalHealth, #Suicide

by: Lauren Soulek

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (KELO) – There is a lot happening right now that can cause #anxiety or #depression, including the #COVID-19 #pandemic and its consequences, conversations or developments having to do with justice and race, or perhaps the politics and happenings of the current election season.
#SeptemberisNationalSuicidePreventionMonth, and Sioux Falls Mayor Paul TenHaken has spoken out about its significance.

According to sdsuicideprevention.org, #suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. And in 2017, South Dakota had the sixth-highest #suicide rate in the country.

“Even in Sioux Falls during the past few months, my office has heard of suicides and we’ve had to deal with suicides in our own community, specifically related to challenges of #COVID and the #coronavirus. And that’s hard to hear because it highlights the fact that right now there’s a lot of #mental anguish that people are experiencing in the city,” Sioux Falls mayor Paul TenHaken said.

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

The month is a time dedicated to opening people up to conversations about #mentalhealth and #suicide.

“It’s so important to talk about #suicideprevention and just #mentalhealth in general. I think people forget that we all have #mentalhealth, so to have those conversations and to normalize those conversations, just like we do with any physical health,” Mallory Kloucek with #NAMI South Dakota said.

And with everything that’s happened around the world in the last six months, it’s even more important to have those conversations.

“Unfortunately for some people, they don’t see a way out. For some they feel that taking their own life is the only option and to me that just is really important that we speak out and say, listen, there are options. It will get better. Contact someone before it gets to the point that it’s too late,” TenHaken said.

Those options include dialing 211 or calling the #suicidepreventionhotline. TenHaken even tweeted that you could reach out to his office.

“I can connect you with a resource as well. I’m not trying to be a middle person in this, but sometimes if there’s a face to it, say, hey this guy wants to help, this office wants to help. Whatever I can do to provide resources to people, I want to be able to do that,” TenHaken said.

And the #NationalAllianceonMentalIllness can help you start conversations about #mentalhealth and #suicide.

“Sometimes we need to do that check-in and it’s important that we do that check-in with each other. How is your #mentalhealth today,” Kloucek said.

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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – Young #Women And #Suicide: ‘I Felt Like A Shell’

Lauren selfie

When Lauren Watson was 24 years old, she thought she wanted to take her own life.

She says grief and a “toxic” relationship after she had her daughter Codie at 16 left her struggling with her #mentalhealth.

“I didn’t even feel like a human being,” Lauren tells Radio 1 Newsbeat.

“I felt like I was a shell, and someone had taken my soul and all of my organs out of me. I felt nothing. I didn’t even feel like a person anymore.”

Lauren and Codie
Lauren and her daughter Codie

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

When Lauren attempted to kill herself in August 2018, she survived.

But others don’t. New figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that across England and Wales, the number of #women taking their own lives in 2019 was at its highest since 2004.

Deaths of those in the age group 10 to 24 increased from 81 in 2012 to 159 last year.

“That figure doesn’t surprise me at all,” Lauren says.

During lockdown, she and her friends went to local #suicide spots and left notes with kind words on them.

Notes
Lauren and her friends left notes in #suicide spots

“We received a lot of messages from doing that, it made me realize a lot more people are suffering than we know.

“People that I knew personally, and never would’ve thought were having a hard time, were reaching out to say thank you.”

‘Nobody knew I was suffering’

Lauren says when she was at her lowest, she worried that opening up would make her look like she was “attention seeking”.

“I felt like nobody would take me seriously, they’d just think I was having a bad day.

Of the 5,691 people who took their own lives in England and Wales last year, about three quarters were #men.

The figures also show the #suicide rate for #men is at its highest for two decades.

Throughout the #pandemic, a number of charities have warned about the impact on #mentalhealth of added #stress, with jobs and incomes up in the air, coupled with less socializing or being outdoors.

There has also been a significant rise in the number of #LGBTQ people seeking #suicideprevention support during the UK’s lockdown.

Emma Carrington is a manager at Rethink, a charity that advises people who are feeling suicidal or struggling with #mentalillness.

She says although it’s important not to speculate about the reasons behind #suicide rates, they have noticed more people calling for emotional support and advice about feeling lonely during lockdown.

Two years on from Lauren’s lowest point, she couldn’t be more glad she survived.

“I learnt that it’s a bad day, not a bad life,” she says.

Presentational grey line

Emma has four main pieces of advice she says she’d give to someone who is struggling:

It’s OK to talk

It can sometimes feel quite shameful when we have these thoughts and we feel like no one really cares.

But actually, there are lots of people that do, whether that’s friends, family, your GP or an advice line.

Have a crisis plan and recognize your triggers

It’s about knowing what can make you feel worse.

When we’re down we do things like looking at the exes photos on #Facebook, we listen to that sad song, we watch that movie that we used to watch with them, all those sorts of things.

Don’t do that!

Stay away from drugs and alcohol

This is not a piece of advice that people always want to hear because when we’re feeling low we often turn to this and feel better.

But actually, they reduce our inhibitions. You are much more likely to act on suicidal thoughts if you’re taking drugs or alcohol, so stay away from them.

Create a care box

It can be a box, a carrier bag or anything. It’s something that you’ve put things in that make you feel better.

It might be your favorite CD, a letter from someone you care about, your favorite jumper or chocolate bar, anything that makes you feel good.

You can kind of pick it up when you’re feeling really low as an act of self care.

For information and support on #mentalhealth and #suicide, access the BBC Action Line.

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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – Signs a #Child Might Be Suicidal

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What to watch out for and how to help

Rachel Ehmke

Some young people who are thinking about #suicide let people close to them know that they are in pain and are open about needing help. Others hide their feelings from family and friends. If you are wondering if your #child is suicidal, experts say that asking him is the best way to find out.

Parents sometimes worry that asking about #suicide may make it more likely, but that actually isn’t the case, and asking is very important. For #children who have a hard time admitting they need help, it sends the message that a parent cares very much about them, and that struggling and asking for help is okay. That conversation can be lifesaving.

While asking is the best way to find out, there are also some warning signs to watch out for if you are worried about #suicide, including the following:

  • #Isolation from friends and family
  • Problems eating or sleeping
  • Mood swings
  • Reckless behavior
  • Dropping grades
  • Increased use of alcohol or drugs
  • Giving away belongings
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or trapped
  • Talking about being a burden to others or not belonging
  • Talking about #suicide or wanting to die
  • Writing or drawing about #suicide, or acting it out in play

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

There are also some risk factors that may make some people more vulnerable to #suicide, like a family history of #suicide, bullying and access to things like firearms and pills. Struggling with a #mentalhealthdisorder or alcohol and substance abuse can also be factors. Learn more about risk factors and protective factors here.

If your #child has any of the warning signs above, ask her if she is thinking about #suicide. If you are worried that she may attempt #suicide, call 911. Experts agree that suicidal thoughts should always be taken seriously.

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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – #SuicidePrevention: How Can You Get Involved?

#Suicide is one of the most challenging societal issues of our time, and sadly, one that affects those who served our Nation at alarming rates. For #Veterans, the #suicide rate is 1.5 times higher and the #female #Veteran #suicide rate is 2.2 times higher than the general population.

There is good news: #suicide is preventable and working together, we can create change and save lives.

On March 5, 2019, President Trump signed Executive Order 13861 establishing a three-year effort known as the President’s Roadmap to Empower #Veterans and End a National Tragedy of #Suicide (PREVENTS). Under the leadership of The White House and VA, the PREVENTS Office and cabinet-level, interagency task force were created to amplify and accelerate our progress in addressing #suicide.  The roadmap was released on June 17, 2020.

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

In July, PREVENTS launched a centerpiece of the initiative: the Nation’s first public health campaign focused on #suicideprevention, REACH. This campaign is for and about everyone because we all have risk and protective factors for #suicide that we need to recognize and understand.  REACH provides the knowledge, tools, and resources that we need to prevent #suicide by educating ourselves so that we can REACH when we are in need – so that we can REACH  to those who feel hopeless. REACH empowers us to reach beyond what we have done before to change the way we think about, talk about, and address emotional pain and suffering.

As a member of the VA community, you are in a position to REACH out to #Veterans who may be at risk during this difficult  time. We all need support – sometimes we need more.

How can you get involved?

Take the PREVENTS Pledge to REACH: Make a commitment to increase awareness of #mentalhealthchallenges  as we work to  prevent #suicide for all #Americans. Visit wearewithinreach.net to sign the pledge and challenge your friends and colleagues to do the same. PREVENTS is planning a month-long pledge drive during September, #SuicidePreventionMonth. Please join us!

#Veterans can also help lead the way as we work to change the way we think about, talk about and address  #mentalhealth and #suicide. #Veterans can give us their perspective and provide guidance as we reach out to those in need. To that end, the PREVENTS Office is launching a first-of-its kind, national survey on Sept. 2, 2020, that will give us invaluable feedback from #Veterans and other stakeholders, including #Veterans Service Organizations, #Veterans’ families and community organizations.  The survey will help us learn what are our #Veterans’ most pressing needs. In addition, the answers we receive will help us understand how Veterans want to receive important information on #mentalhealthservices and #suicideprevention.

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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – #Teen Suicides: What Are the Risk Factors?

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Temperament, family and community all play a role

Nadine Kaslow, PhD

One of the myths about suicidal talk, and actual #suicide attempts, in young people is that they are just a bid for attention or “a cry for help.” #Kids who talk or write about killing themselves are dismissed as overly dramatic—obviously they don’t mean it! But a threat of #suicide should never be dismissed, even from a kid who cries “Wolf!” so many times it’s tempting to stop taking her seriously. It’s important to respond to threats and other warning signs in a serious and thoughtful manner. They don’t automatically mean that a #child is going to attempt #suicide. But it’s a chance you can’t take.

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

When thinking about this, it helps to understand what factors make a young person more or less likely to consider or attempt #suicide. What do we know about young people who try to kill themselves, or who actually die by #suicide? Let’s take a look at both the risk factors—things that increase the likelihood that a #child will engage in suicidal behavior—and the protective factors, or things that reduce the risk.

If a #child has a lot of risk factors and hardly any protective factors you need to be extremely concerned about him. On the other hand, if he has a fair number of risk factors but a lot of protective factors you may be somewhat less concerned, although you still, of course, need to be concerned.

Here are some key #suicide risk factors:

  • A recent or serious loss. This might include the death of a family member, a friend or a pet. The separation or a divorce of parents, or a breakup with a boyfriend or a girlfriend, can also be felt as a profound loss, along with a parent losing a job, or the family losing their home.
  • A psychiatric disorder, particularly a mood disorder like #depression, or a trauma– and stress-related disorder.
  • Prior #suicide attempts increase risk for another #suicide attempt.
  • Alcohol and other substance use disorders, as well as getting into a lot of trouble, having disciplinary problems, engaging in a lot of high-risk behaviors.
  • Struggling with sexual orientation in an environment that is not respectful or accepting of that orientation. The issue is not whether a #child is #gay or #lesbian, but whether he or she is struggling to come out in an unsupportive environment.
  • A family history of #suicide is something that can be really significant and concerning, as is a history of #domesticviolence, #child abuse or neglect.
  • Lack of social support. A #child who doesn’t feel support from significant adults in her life, as well as her friends, can become so isolated that #suicide seems to present the only way out of her problems.
  • Bullying. We know that being a victim of bullying is a risk factor, but there’s also some evidence that kids who are bullies may be at increased risk for suicidal behavior.
  • Access to lethal means, like firearms and pills.
  • #Stigma associated with asking for help. One of the things we know is that the more hopeless and helpless people feel, the more likely they are to choose to hurt themselves or end their life. Similarly, if they feel a lot of guilt or shame, or if they feel worthless or have low self-esteem.
  • Barriers to accessing services: Difficulties in getting much-needed services include lack of bilingual service providers, unreliable transportation, and the financial cost of services.
  • Cultural and religious beliefs that #suicide is a noble way to resolve a personal dilemma.

But what about protective factors, things that can mitigate the risk of engaging in suicidal behavior?

Telehealth 2020

Here are some key protective factors:

  • Good problem-solving abilities. #Kids who are able to see a problem and figure out effective ways to manage it, to resolve conflicts in non-violent ways, are at lower risk.
  • Strong connections. The stronger the connections #kids have to their families, to their friends, and to people in the community, the less likely they are to harm themselves. Partly, that’s because they feel loved and supported, and partly because they have people to turn to when they’re struggling and feel really challenged.
  • Restricted access to highly lethal means of #suicide.
  • Cultural and religious beliefs that discourage #suicide and that support self-preservation.
  • Relatively easy access to appropriate clinical intervention, whether that be psychotherapy, individual, group, family therapy, or medication if indicated.
  • Effective care for #mental, physical, and substance use disorders. Good medical and #mentalhealthcare involves ongoing relationships, making #kids feel connected to professionals who take care of them and are available to them.

So what do you do if your #child fits the profile of someone at risk for #youth #suicide? Warning signs of #suicide to be alert to include changes in personality or behavior that might not be obviously related to #suicide. When a #teenager becomes sad, more withdrawn, more irritable, anxious, tired, or apathetic—things that used to be fun aren’t fun anymore—you should be concerned. Changes in sleep patterns or eating habits can also be red flags.

Acting erratically, or recklessly is also a warning sign. If a #teen starts making really poor judgments, or he starts doing things that are harmful to himself or other people, like bullying or fighting, it can be a sign that he is spinning out of control.

And, finally, if a #child is talking about dying, you should always pay attention. “I wish I was dead.” “I just want to disappear.” “Maybe I should jump off that building.” “Maybe I should shoot myself.” “You’d all be better off if I wasn’t around.” When you hear this kind of talk, it’s important to take it seriously—even if you can’t imagine your #child meaning it seriously.

What to do? The first thing to do is talk.

For more information and resources on #suicide, see the APA’s #suicide help page.

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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – Over 25 Percent Of Young Adults Considered #Suicide, #CDC Says

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#Mentalhealthexperts and public health officials say they are concerned about the #pandemic’s effect on #mentalhealth; indeed, #CDC research indicates more than a quarter of #young adults have considered committing #suicide.

Rutherford County Commissioner Craig Harris, who has made the opioid epidemic and #mentalhealth a priority in his public service, said he is concerned about the county’s #suicide rate.

“I feel like #COVID is definitely attributable,” Harris said. “Any time you isolate someone who’s battling addiction, it’s a dangerous thing. Idle time is one of the worst things that can happen to an addict.”

Tyler Bowman, business development director at Tulip Hill Recovery, which helps treat addictions, said he also worries about the #pandemic’s effects on suicides. The #pandemic had led to a decrease in people seeking help for addiction, and now overdoses are increasing and people are seeking help for addiction, he said.

Many people coming for help had never had substance abuse issues before the #pandemic, he said.

He also said he is afraid that #mentalhealthissues are getting forgotten in the state of concern over the #coronavirus.

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

The #U.S.CentersforDiseaseControlandPrevention recently released a report on the status of #Americans’ #mentalhealth based on a survey of 5,470 adults. The survey is titled, “#MentalHealth, Substance Use, and #SuicidalIdeation During the #COVID-19 #Pandemic – United States, June 24-30, 2020.”

It found 40.9 percent reported at least having one adverse mental or behavioral health condition, such as: symptoms of #anxiety disorder or depressive disorder (30.9 percent), symptoms of a trauma-related disorder (26.3 percent), and having started or increased substance use (13.3 percent).

The #CDC found that 10.7 percent of adults had seriously considered #suicide in the prior 30 days, and the figure for adults ages 18-24 was even higher — 25.5 percent. Ethnic results for #suicideideation included #Hispanic, 18.6 percent; and #Blacks, 15.1 percent. Unpaid caregivers for adults reported a rate of 30.7 percent. Essential workers, meanwhile, reported a rate of 21.7 percent.

The Jason Foundation

Brett Marciel is director of business development and public relations for The Jason Foundation Inc. The Hendersonville-based foundation combats youth suicides.

It’s too soon to have data about suicides during the #pandemic period, Marciel said, because it takes time for the foundation to get its statistics; the latest information from the #CDC is from 2018. Getting the relevant data could take a year.

“But with that said, many experts we talk to really push it out there that there will be a problem with #mentalhealth in the coming future,” he said.

That’s because of #isolation and that it is harder to access healthcare services, Marciel said. Historically, suicides increase when the unemployment rate increases.

“It’s not something we can see now, but you’re less able to rely on your social network when you’re not seeing anybody day-to-day,” he said. “Anytime you take somebody who may have a #mentalillness … the #isolation, the lack of connectedness can exacerbate the problems.”

Marciel pointed to an April CNN report quoting the Substance Abuse and #MentalHealthServices Administration, which said call volumes to its Disaster Distress Helpline increased 338 percent versus February. March year-to-year calls increased 891 percent.

The Tennessee #SuicidePrevention Network website (tspn.org) provides a number of warning signs of possible #suicideideation, including but not limited to:

  • · Talking about #suicide, death, and/or no reason to live
  • · Preoccupation with death and dying
  • · Withdrawal from friends and/or social activities
  • · Experience of a recent severe loss (especially a relationship) or the threat of a significant loss
  • · Experience or fear of a situation of humiliation of failure
  • · Drastic changes in behavior
  • · Loss of interest in hobbies, work, school, etc.
  • · Preparation for death by making out a will (unexpectedly) and final arrangements
  • · Giving away prized possessions
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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – Back To #School Is Not Back To Normal And #COVID-19 Can Take #MentalHealth Toll On #Kids

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COLUMBUS, Ohio — Parents across Central Ohio are concerned about the toll the #pandemic is taking on their #children. Some districts are still grappling with whether to bring #kids back to #school in-person or remotely.

Cara Stefanko has two daughters in the Olentangy School District. She’s advocating for #students to be allowed to come back to the classroom because of what parents are telling her. Back to #school is not to normal and #COVID-19 can take #mentalhealth toll on 90% Parents across Central Ohio are concerned about the toll the #pandemic is taking on their #children. Some districts are still grappling with whether to bring #kids back to #school in-person or remotely.

“They are seeing #depression and #anxiety in their #kids from being separated and from the uncertainty of all this,” said Stefanko.

“Our #kids really are not thriving under this quarantine. And #kids need each other,” said the working mother.

#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

The #SuicidePrevention Coordinator at Nationwide Children’s Hospital John Ackerman said they are not seeing a spike in suicides during #COVID-19, but he is concerned. “I am worried about #mentalhealth. Absolutely. We are seeing increased #anxiety, we are seeing increased #depression, that is accurate. More crisis lines are receiving calls.”

“If you are in an abusive home. If you are in a place where #isolation is just unbearable to you then that may be something we are concerned about it,” said Ackerman.

Ackerman, a psychologist said when there is in-person #school or remote learning, it’s important to establish routines, including for eating, sleeping, and exercising. Ackerman said #children take their cues from adults. He suggests saying to #children, “what are some ways that we can make each day predictable for you, and how can we really reinforce that this year is different but you are going to be okay.”

“Make sure you are doing regular emotional check-ins with your #kids, regardless of whether they are giving you clear warning signs,” said Ackerman.

Stefanko, a #nurse, said she thinks the rewards of returning to #school outweigh the risks and that it can be done safely. “You don’t just give up and hide when something is rough. You come up with a plan, and you have to keep living. That is what we want our kids to learn.”

Parents in several districts are planning rallies next week to show support for in-person learning. The Board of Education at Grandview Heights Saturday approved all virtual learning to start their year. The two largest districts in Franklin County are also planning on a remote start.

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#JamesDonaldson on #MentalHealth – #Parents Anxious About The #MentalHealth Affects Of Remote Learning

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#JamesDonaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WICS/WRSP) — Many #children already get anxious near the start of a new school year but now with so many different changes to the school setting, this year maybe even harder for students to adjust.

Pediatrician and Director of Weight loss and Wellness at Memorial Health Dr.Nicole Florence says this school year will come with a wide range of health challenges for parents and #children to tackle.

“We have to consider the impact of being more sedentary, not necessarily having structure and routine which can affect a child’s health in many of the ways we worry about mood disorder, #anxiety, #depression,” said Dr.Florence.

Sarah Rogers is a District 186 parent who said it might be time for #schools to flesh out plans for how the new isolated learning style will impact children’s #mentalhealth.

“I think the #suicide rate I think the #depression rate I think I mean I’ve read many articles those are skyrocketing right now so I think the #mentalhealth of #children is what we really need to be focused on,” said Rogers.

Another Springfield mom Kari Zeedyk said her main concern is #children not being able to focus on school work with all this new alone time.

” The #isolation of being at home I’m sure will definitely impact their level of happiness throughout the day without having other #kids to interact with and to expand socially which is so much of early education,” said Zeedyk.

Parents I spoke with say they are utilizing #socialmedia to scout out new ways to keep children active, happy, and health under the soon to come new hybrid learning style.

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Look At All The Great Things That Have Been Happening At PAWS

As a proud PAWS (Progressive Animal Welfare Society) board member, I wanted to be sure to share this wonderful article with you in the Puget Sound Business Journal.

Lead by our wonderful CEO/Executive Director, Heidi Wills, with her experience, vision and leadership capabilities, PAWS is moving into a very bright future, being one of the preeminent animal care and welfare agencies in the country.

Animals are wonderful companions, especially in the care of responsible owners, and PAWS has a very well trained staff to help you get just the right companion for you.

Also upcoming, our new facility/campus, which will further expand our capabilities and services.

Enjoy the article (click the link below to view), and keep PAWS in mind when you want to have a worthy cause to contribute to.

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